Creative works

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  • Creative work
    Under the Bridge
    Weaver, Rose (2022)

    This research involves the production of a documentary film and accompanying exegesis about gender non-conforming (GNC) middle-aged lesbian women (European descent and Aboriginal) and examines cultures of belonging and un-belonging in the Northern Rivers of NSW. Research Question: How can the complex lives of middle-aged GNC lesbian women from Northern Rivers NSW be documented in an appropriately ethical and affirmative manner? This is the first documentary film in any setting that celebrates the physical embodiment and corporeality of (rural) lesbian women alongside their stories of living with oppression while creating thriving communities. The research interrogates filmmaking practices and develops feminist, queer, ethnographic, minor and post-qualitative theories. A community streaming event for the Northern Rivers lesbian community was held on the 8th October 2021. This event alongside the filming production experience benefits the Northern Rivers lesbian community in offering them affirming representation in film and instigating open discussions and lively conversations that support further community cohesion and celebration.

    This feature length documentary film will be submitted to the following film festivals: Melbourne Documentary FF - screens July 2022, Melbourne Queer FF - screens Nov 2022, Byron Bay International FF - screens Dec 2022, Antenna Documentary FF Sydney - screens Feb 2023, + appropriate international film festivals.

    As well as the potential for the film to be shown globally this research also contributes to existing literature by further developing ethical documentary practice in marginal communities and the documenting of rural middle-aged GNC lesbian lives and stories.

  • Creative work
    Real Rural Women's Leadership - Episode 9: Professor Jacqui Ewart chats with Dr Amanda Gearing
    Ewart, Jacqueline (2022)

    Background The Real Rural Women’s Leadership project was a funded by the Federal Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and was a partnership between Care Balonne in St George, University of Sunshine Coast and Griffith University. The project ran from 1 August 2021 to 31 May 2022. A series of podcasts were developed as part of a research project focussing on women’s leadership in regional, rural and remote Australia. I interviewed women leaders in news organisations in rural, remote and regional Australia about their experiences, what contribution their news sites make to their communities and their view of leadership.

    Contribution The project’s activity focuses on facilitating community resilience, building the capacity of local women to earn income, and on fostering leadership skills by harnessing the skills and strengths that already exist within the Balonne Shire. This project is specifically designed to enable greater autonomy and capacity to agricultural producers as well as other community members and businesspeople affected by the drought and the Murray Darling Basin Plan. It aims to help local economies by empowering the local community to share good practices in business leadership and management, diversify income streams (such as through the creation of secondary and online businesses), collaborate on developing a strategy to transition to larger markets including international markets of existing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as diversifying how SMEs market and sell to local and national markets.

    Significance This is the first time a series of podcasts has been produced about rural, regional and remote women’s experiences of leadership, and specifically their experiences and leadership of news sites and newspapers in these locations. They have been made freely and publicly available to benefit women and those living in regional, rural and remote Australia and those who want to know about them.

  • Creative work
    Real Rural Women's Leadership - Episode 23: Professor Jacqui Ewart chats with Jen Gourlay
    Ewart, Jacqueline (2022)

    Background The Real Rural Women’s Leadership project was a funded by the Federal Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and was a partnership between Care Balonne in St George, University of Sunshine Coast and Griffith University. The project ran from 1 August 2021 to 31 May 2022. A series of podcasts were developed as part of a research project focussing on women’s leadership in regional, rural and remote Australia. I interviewed women leaders in news organisations in rural, remote and regional Australia about their experiences, what contribution their news sites make to their communities and their view of leadership. Contribution The project’s activity focuses on facilitating community resilience, building the capacity of local women to earn income, and on fostering leadership skills by harnessing the skills and strengths that already exist within the Balonne Shire. This project is specifically designed to enable greater autonomy and capacity to agricultural producers as well as other community members and businesspeople affected by the drought and the Murray Darling Basin Plan. It aims to help local economies by empowering the local community to share good practices in business leadership and management, diversify income streams (such as through the creation of secondary and online businesses), collaborate on developing a strategy to transition to larger markets including international markets of existing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as diversifying how SMEs market and sell to local and national markets. Significance This is the first time a series of podcasts has been produced about rural, regional and remote women’s experiences of leadership, and specifically their experiences and leadership of news sites and newspapers in these locations. They have been made freely and publicly available to benefit women and those living in regional, rural and remote Australia and those who want to know about them.

  • Creative work
    Real Rural Women's Leadership - Episode 20: Dr Jacqui Ewart chats with Helen Tatchell
    Ewart, Jacqueline (2022)

    Background The Real Rural Women’s Leadership project was a funded by the Federal Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and was a partnership between Care Balonne in St George, University of Sunshine Coast and Griffith University. The project ran from 1 August 2021 to 31 May 2022. A series of podcasts were developed as part of a research project focussing on women’s leadership in regional, rural and remote Australia. I interviewed women leaders in news organisations in rural, remote and regional Australia about their experiences, what contribution their news sites make to their communities and their view of leadership. Contribution The project’s activity focuses on facilitating community resilience, building the capacity of local women to earn income, and on fostering leadership skills by harnessing the skills and strengths that already exist within the Balonne Shire. This project is specifically designed to enable greater autonomy and capacity to agricultural producers as well as other community members and businesspeople affected by the drought and the Murray Darling Basin Plan. It aims to help local economies by empowering the local community to share good practices in business leadership and management, diversify income streams (such as through the creation of secondary and online businesses), collaborate on developing a strategy to transition to larger markets including international markets of existing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as diversifying how SMEs market and sell to local and national markets. Significance This is the first time a series of podcasts has been produced about rural, regional and remote women’s experiences of leadership, and specifically their experiences and leadership of news sites and newspapers in these locations. They have been made freely and publicly available to benefit women and those living in regional, rural and remote Australia and those who want to know about them.

  • Creative work
    Real Rural Women's Leadership - Episode 25: Professor Jacqui Ewart chats with Margaret Simons
    Ewart, Jacqueline (2022)

    Background The Real Rural Women’s Leadership project was a funded by the Federal Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and was a partnership between Care Balonne in St George, University of Sunshine Coast and Griffith University. The project ran from 1 August 2021 to 31 May 2022. A series of podcasts were developed as part of a research project focussing on women’s leadership in regional, rural and remote Australia. I interviewed women leaders in news organisations in rural, remote and regional Australia about their experiences, what contribution their news sites make to their communities and their view of leadership. Contribution The project’s activity focuses on facilitating community resilience, building the capacity of local women to earn income, and on fostering leadership skills by harnessing the skills and strengths that already exist within the Balonne Shire. This project is specifically designed to enable greater autonomy and capacity to agricultural producers as well as other community members and businesspeople affected by the drought and the Murray Darling Basin Plan. It aims to help local economies by empowering the local community to share good practices in business leadership and management, diversify income streams (such as through the creation of secondary and online businesses), collaborate on developing a strategy to transition to larger markets including international markets of existing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as diversifying how SMEs market and sell to local and national markets. Significance This is the first time a series of podcasts has been produced about rural, regional and remote women’s experiences of leadership, and specifically their experiences and leadership of news sites and newspapers in these locations. They have been made freely and publicly available to benefit women and those living in regional, rural and remote Australia and those who want to know about them.

  • Creative work
    Real Rural Women's Leadership - Episode 15: Professor Jacqui Ewart chats with Genevieve Jacobs
    Ewart, Jacqueline (2022)

    Background The Real Rural Women’s Leadership project was a funded by the Federal Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and was a partnership between Care Balonne in St George, University of Sunshine Coast and Griffith University. The project ran from 1 August 2021 to 31 May 2022. A series of podcasts were developed as part of a research project focussing on women’s leadership in regional, rural and remote Australia. I interviewed women leaders in news organisations in rural, remote and regional Australia about their experiences, what contribution their news sites make to their communities and their view of leadership. Contribution The project’s activity focuses on facilitating community resilience, building the capacity of local women to earn income, and on fostering leadership skills by harnessing the skills and strengths that already exist within the Balonne Shire. This project is specifically designed to enable greater autonomy and capacity to agricultural producers as well as other community members and businesspeople affected by the drought and the Murray Darling Basin Plan. It aims to help local economies by empowering the local community to share good practices in business leadership and management, diversify income streams (such as through the creation of secondary and online businesses), collaborate on developing a strategy to transition to larger markets including international markets of existing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as diversifying how SMEs market and sell to local and national markets. Significance This is the first time a series of podcasts has been produced about rural, regional and remote women’s experiences of leadership, and specifically their experiences and leadership of news sites and newspapers in these locations. They have been made freely and publicly available to benefit women and those living in regional, rural and remote Australia and those who want to know about them.

  • Creative work
    thoughts no thinker
    Harding, Jason (2022)

    thoughts no thinker

    2022

    Originally written for Griffith Review 75's call for submissions on 'learning curves' but was rejected. So when I had some space I refined it and decided to self-publish the work (online at www.jasonharding.com).

    The work is a piece of poetic inquiry.

    It focusses on Griffith Review’s question; “What does a good education look like … in a sector that’s facing an uncertain philosophical future?” - and leverages the ideas and ways of thinking of numerous authors, artists, musicians, philosophers, and cultures (including our own Australian Indigenous Peoples) to pose it needs to go far beyond just content, courses and degrees.

    Given the nature of my teaching this piece of poetic inquiry became my final speech to students enrolled in many of my courses. And in the context of higher education’s uncertain philosophical future those courses that with which it began - regardless of the topic or discipline - deep dives that are deeply personal.

    In my work and teaching I use poetry and spoken word to communicate ideas, ideals and theories in a “more approachable, powerful, emotionally poignant and accurate [manner] than traditional prose [allows]” (Faulkner, 2019, xi). I piece together my philosophies and the philosophies of others in innovative and creative ways, maintain high-end academic rigour. It has become a major part of my teaching delivery method. I do what Norman Denzin once wrote, “the poet makes the world visible in new and different ways” (Denzin, 2013, p86). And I can prompt critical and vigorous debate and discussion on any topic by way of this technique.

    The work was submitted to Griffith Review on 22nd October 2021, reviewed and rejected by Griffith Review on 30th November 2021 and was self-published on 17th October 2022.

  • Creative work
    this way
    Harding, Jason (2022)

    this way

    2022

    The original prompt was a period of study on the art of printmaking.

    And the created work arose from immersion in the process and practice of both printmaking of zen.

    The created work is an intaglio print.

    ink ⎮ paper

    305mm x 223mm ⎮ Landscape

    With a similar focus as the associated text (thoughts no thinker).

    An investigation into what lies beyond our minds and all our words - that which is “unwilled, unleashed, unbound” - a way and a visual example of lifelong learning that taps into experience beyond that of intellectual understanding.

    I closed my eyes whilst I etched the marks.

    In my work and teaching I often use photography, graphic design, printmaking, art and arts-based methods to communicate without language. Without the constraint caused by its abstraction and subsequent reduction. To go beyond the ‘deception of symbols‘ (Watts, 1972). And show others a concrete reality for which I have – and there are – no words.

    In doing so I open up - and free up - the thinking of viewers, readers and students. I give them new ways to link their thinking and to also push that thinking further. I also use these types of methods to break down the substantial barriers created for students who are using English as a second language. So they don’t lose heart when they cannot find the words.

    I also use the creation of visual imagery, art and design as a stimulus for ideas and as part of my writing process.

  • Creative work
    16 Architectural Responses for the Outback Museum of Australia
    Dupre, Karine (2022)

    In March 2021, the Murweh Shire submitted an application to the Building Better Regions Fund to create a major tourism and gateway hub, as the council had identified that sustainable tourism and associated infrastructure development would be central economic pillars for diversifying the economy and building rural economy resilience. In October 2021, the Murweh Shire Council was informed about the success of their application, which included the building of the Outback Museum Of Australia (OMOA). OMOA will be located in the Top Secret Tourism Precinct, which is the new tourism precinct of Charleville. The purpose of the competition was to explore major design issues and opportunities for OMOA site. Following the compliance review of the competition submissions, the Jury was provided 16 submissions to review. Each competitor submitted a concept design (2 x A1 posters) and an Expression of Interest report (20x A4) explaining their approach to the site, design concept, the benefits of their respective schemes, as well as their capacity, capability and experience. This exhibition presents the 16 proposals and demonstrates the environmental and cultural responses to the architectural brief, with an emphasis on climatic highlights. This exhibition is taking place both online and in the Mulga Land Gallery of Charleville (Qld). This outcome is part of the CCR with Murwhe Shire.

  • Creative work
    emerge
    Harding, Jason (So Fi Zine, 2022)

    The prompt was a lecture I was to deliver on the topic of power. And subsequently a call for submission (So Fi Zine Issue 12) - an indie publication for sociological fiction, poetry, and visual art.

    The created work arose from repeatedly finding the same word - or versions of it - emerge - emergent - emerging - in the lecture’s reading and reference materials.

    The work is a short poem / poetic + spoken word piece. A early draft of it formed part of the lecture and a refined and completed text-based version was subsequently published in So Fi Zine’s Issue 11.

    It is a statement on power, agency, and true wisdom.

    In my work and teaching I use poetry and spoken word to communicate ideas, ideals and theories in a “more approachable, powerful, emotionally poignant and accurate [manner] than traditional prose [allows]” (Faulkner, 2019, xi). I piece together my philosophies and the philosophies of others in innovative and creative ways, maintain high-end academic rigor. It has become a major part of my teaching delivery method. I do what Norman Denzin once wrote, “the poet makes the world visible in new and different ways” (Denzin, 2013, p86). And I can prompt critical and vigorous debate and discussion on any topic by way of this technique.

    The work was reviewed and accepted by So Fi Zine’s founder / editor Ashleigh Watson (UNSW) on 17th October 2022 and was published on 10th December 2022.

    So Fi Zine is an indie publication for sociological fiction, poetry, and visual art with eleven editions published so far - the 12th (which I also have work accepted) is currently - at the time of writing - being produced and will be published before the end of 2022.

    So Fi Zine’s website receives around 4.5K views every 6 months.

  • Creative work
    emergent
    Harding, Jason (So Fi Zine, 2022)

    The prompt was a lecture I was to deliver on the topic of power. And subsequently a call for submission (So Fi Zine Issue 12) - an indie publication for sociological fiction, poetry, and visual art.

    The created work arose from repeatedly finding the same word - or versions of it - emerge - emergent - emerging - in the lecture’s reading and reference materials.

    The created work is a piece of visual art. Letraset on concrete.

    With the same focus as the associated text (emerge). A statement on power, agency, and true wisdom.

    In my work and teaching I use photography, graphic design, printmaking, art and arts-based methods to communicate without language. Without the constraint caused by its abstraction and subsequent reduction. To go beyond the ‘deception of symbols‘ (Watts, 1972). And show others a concrete reality for which I have – and there are – no words.

    In doing so I open up - and free up - the thinking of viewers, readers and students. I give them new ways to link their thinking and to also push that thinking further. I also use these types of methods to break down the substantial barriers created for students who are using English as a second language. So they don’t lose heart when they cannot find the words.

    I also use the creation of visual imagery as a stimulus for ideas and as part of my writing process.

    So Fi Zine is an indie publication for sociological fiction, poetry, and visual art with eleven editions published so far - the 12th (which I also have work accepted) is currently - at the time of writing - being produced and will be published before the end of 2022.

    So Fi Zine’s website receives around 4.5K views every 6 months.

  • Creative work
    dehli to dehradun
    Harding, Jason; Watson, Ashleigh (So Fi Zine, 2022)

    The prompt was a call for submission (So Fi Zine Issue 10) - new sociological fiction poetry and art - no set theme.

    The created work is a single photograph.

    With the same focus as the associated text (arrogant ghost). A statement on the often false narratives and conclusions portrait and street photography captures and communicates by way of the skill in framing and the assumptions, biases and ultimate aims of the photographer.

    In my work and teaching I use photography, graphic design, printmaking, art and arts-based methods to communicate without language. Without the constraint caused by its abstraction and subsequent reduction. To go beyond the ‘deception of symbols‘ (Watts, 1972). And show others a concrete reality for which I have – and there are – no words.

    In doing so I open up - and free up - the thinking of viewers, readers and students. I give them new ways to link their thinking and to also push that thinking further. I also use these types of methods to break down the substantial barriers created for students who are using English as a second language. So they don’t lose heart when they cannot find the words.

    The work was reviewed and accepted by So Fi Zine’s founder / editor Ashleigh Watson (UNSW) on 12th November 2021 and was published on 23rd February 2022.

    So Fi Zine is an indie publication for sociological fiction, poetry, and visual art with eleven editions published so far - the 12th (which I also have work accepted) is currently - at the time of writing - being produced and will be published before the end of 2022.

    So Fi Zine’s website receives around 4.5K views every 6 months.

  • Creative work
    arrogant ghost
    Harding, Jason; Watson, Ashleigh (So Fi Zine, 2022-02-23)

    The prompt was a call for submission (So Fi Zine Issue 10) - new sociological fiction poetry and art - no set theme.

    The created work is a short poem / poetic + spoken word piece on the often false narratives and conclusions portrait and street photography captures and communicates by way of the skill in framing and the assumptions, biases and ultimate aims of the photographer.

    In my work and teaching I use poetry and spoken word to communicate ideas, ideals and theories in a “more approachable, powerful, emotionally poignant and accurate [manner] than traditional prose [allows]” (Faulkner, 2019, xi). I piece together my philosophies and the philosophies of others in innovative and creative ways, maintain high-end academic rigor. It has become a major part of my teaching delivery method. I do what Norman Denzin once wrote, “the poet makes the world visible in new and different ways” (Denzin, 2013, p86). And I can prompt critical and vigorous debate and discussion on any topic without asking one single question.

    The work was reviewed and accepted by So Fi Zine’s founder / editor Ashleigh Watson (UNSW) on 12th November 2021 and was published on 23rd February 2022.

    So Fi Zine is an indie publication for sociological fiction, poetry, and visual art with eleven editions published so far - the 12th (which I also have work accepted) is currently - at the time of writing - being produced and will be published before the end of 2022.

    So Fi Zine’s website receives around 4.5K views every 6 months.

  • Creative work
    Farsh-e-Parandeh (Flying Carpet)
    Honari, Leila; Franzidis, Evie (2015)

    Research Background:

    This work is situated in the field of animation, moving image design and humanities storytelling. It comprises areas of Persian carpet design and ancient fables, with the concept of early optical cinematic devices, such as the zoetrope and praxinoscope. The work investigates the relationship between the mandala, and universal philosophical concepts of wholeness through fragmentation.

    Research Contribution:

    Comprising 16 looping sequences integrated in a mandalic pattern, this work transforms both the concept of a static carpet into a moving form, and challenges the notion of linear forms of animated storytelling but creating an integrated synthesised story-pattern visualised through concentric geometric shapes and motifs, including frames of flora/fauna and arabesque borders. The work is projected from ceiling mount to the floor, allowing for interactive audience engagement.

    Research Significance:

    Included in a week-long group exhibition focused on alternate forms of visual and moving image storytelling, and held at the State Library of Queensland with an overall public audience of approximately 1000. It was publicised as part of the SLQ range of exhibition installations.

  • Creative work
    The Creatures of Prometheus Ballet (Australian Premiere)
    Lynch, Lucas (2021)

    Research Background:

    This research is on Conducting Beethoven’s The Creatures of Prometheus Ballet: An Autoethnographic Study in Performance Practice. The central research question is: what specialised artistic skills and artistic relationships are required to successfully conduct The Creatures of Prometheus ballet? The intention is to build a greater awareness of the role of a ballet conductor, thereby developing a firm grasp on the full capabilities, requirements and duties that a ballet conductor has to perform on a regular basis. These involve collaboration with choreographers, analysis of the score, rehearsing with dancers and the ability to conduct an orchestra. By utilising this ballet as my primary focus, it will help inform what specialised skills were applied and could be used on other ballets.

    Research Contribution:

    By presenting this Australian Premiere it has contribute to the cultural landscape of works performed by emerging Australian artists, creators and performers. This performance may also go a long way to recognising the significance of Beethoven’s rare ballet and reintroduce this work to the existing canon of ballet repertoire.

    Research Significance:

    This 220 year-old ballet was premiered in Brisbane, Australia 2021 and witnessed by over 1000 audience members and reviewed by two major arts critics. To date there has been no significant attempt to recreate a stylistically and historically appropriate retelling of the original story since its first premiere in 1801. Finally, using this model of research will highlight challenges and strategies that future ballet conductor’s could employ in their own development for other ballet productions.

  • Creative work
    Lamb
    Bodie, Jane; Meyrick, Julian (2018)

    From multi-award-winning playwright Jane Bodie, and featuring original songs by Mark Seymour (Mark Seymour and the Undertow, Hunters and Collectors), Lamb is the story of one family on an Australian sheep farm, over generations – the guilt of those who left; the lost desires of those who stayed behind.

  • Creative work
    The Realistic Joneses
    Eno, Will; Meyrick, Julian (2017)

    Meet Bob and Jennifer Jones and the new couple next door, John and Pony Jones. The Joneses share more than a name, and more than they would like to admit.

    A dazzling play of great wit and insight, The Realistic Joneses is about how we grapple with morality and deal with the immense mystery of life

  • Creative work
    As We Forgive
    Holloway, Tom; Meyrick, Julian (2016)

    Tom Holloway’s writing shines for its subtlety, integrity and grace. One of Australia’s most celebrated playwrights, his work has been performed widely, both in Australia and abroad. As We Forgive unites Holloway with award-winning director Julian Meyrick and Tasmanian acting legend Robert Jarman. A searing investigation of contemporary morality, this absorbing production examines the motives, methods and meaning of forgiveness.

    Accompanied on stage by a lone cellist, Jarman portrays three men at the edges of society trying to come to terms with the events in their lives. Each has a story to tell. Each has a reason for why they behaved as they did. What you’ll see is a struggle with the act of forgiveness.

  • Creative work
    Mi:Wi 3027
    Shea, Glenn; Meyrick, Julian (2018)

    Mi:Wi 3027 is based on the incredible true story of a lifelong friendship developed between the first Ngarrindjeri serviceman from the South Australian community of Raukkan, Roland Carter, and Jewish German ethnologist Leonhard Adam. Captured while fighting for the Australian Imperial Forces on the Western Front, Roland was incarcerated in a camp for prisoners of special interest. Leonhard, a new graduate from the University of Berlin, was sent to interrogate these POW’s about their cultural backgrounds and beliefs.

    A warm comradery sprang up between the two young men, one that was destined to last over forty years, and go through a remarkable reversal through the next World War.

    Mi:Wi 3027 has sweeping themes of imperialism, oppression, war and an unshakeable longing for freedom. And, at the heart of it all, a friendship that endured through some of the most tumultuous upheavals of the twentieth centur

  • Creative work
    Nearer the Gods
    Williamson, David; Meyrick, Julian (2018)