Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal

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  • Journal article
    The stability of personality over time as a function of personality trait dominance
    Wilks, Leigh (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    This essay examines alternative theories explaining the extent of personality change over time. Personality is initially conceptualized in terms of temperament and traits, which indicate overarching personality stability across the lifespan. Despite high rank-order correlations of trait scores, measurements of individual differences and group mean trait scores reveal change over time. Beyond the scope of temperament and traits, aspects such as evolutionary mechanisms, characteristic adaptations, life narratives, and culture also contribute to personality change or stability. Although small changes in personality emerge across situations, a substantial amount of research supports the notion of enduring personality stability over the life span.

  • Journal article
    Personality measures under focus: The NEO-PI-R and the MBTI
    Frida Johnsson (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    The concept of personality has for a long time attracted the interests of psychologists. As a result there are numerous theoretical approaches to the measurement of personality. This report will present two of these approaches and further discuss, compare, and contrast a personality measure of each approach. The personality approaches and measures under focus are the well known trait model, Big Five and its widely used measure, the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory Revised (NEO-PI-R) (Costa & McCrae, 1992), and the also commonly applied, but at the same time often criticized, Myer-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) (Myers, 1962), which is based on Carl Jung's type theory (1921, as cited in Jung, 1971). In this paper, a brief description of the personality concept and the usefulness of personality measures are initially presented. Following this, a general discussion of the Big Five model and the MBTI will be presented. In the following sections, the NEO-PI-R and MBTI measures are described in more detail, concluding with a comparison between these two measures.

  • Journal article
    The science of wisdom: An exploration of excellence in mind and virtue
    Bundock, Anne (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    In recent years, psychologists have begun to explore the rare and elusive human quality of wisdom. The challenges they face are many: wisdom is difficult to conceptualise, expensive and time-consuming to study, and no generally agreed definition of wisdom has yet emerged. Rather, researchers have defined it according to their own philosophical orientation and particular work focus. As such, this essay will briefly review the current conceptualisation, definition, and operationalisation of wisdom by principal researchers in this field. Specifically, this will involve a review of the Berlin Wisdom Paradigm and the Three Dimensional Wisdom paradigm. Furthermore, findings on the antecedents and correlates of having and maintaining wisdom will be summarised, and similarities and differences between the models will be discussed.

  • Journal article
    Attachment theory predicts the formation of romantic relationships
    Rob Pearce (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    This essay reviews the literature on attachment theory. Attachment theory and the methods used to assess attachment systems are critiqued. The usefulness of attachment theory for predicting romantic relationships is also examined. Attachment theory is found to be a valid and reliable construct, especially that of secure attachment. In contrast non-secure attachment systems are less reliable. The secure attachment system is also shown to be a significant predictor of acquiring a stable romantic relationship in adulthood. Directions for future research are provided, especially with regard to refining non-secure attachment constructs.

  • Journal article
    Research Profile - Dr Tamara Ownsworth
    Ownsworth, Tamara (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)
  • Journal article
    Article Review: Personality assessment in organisational settings
    Rob Pearce (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    This review critiques a research paper entitled In Support of Personality Assessment in Organizational Settings (Ones, Dilchert, Viswesvaran, & Judge, 2007). The research paper reported a meta-analysis supporting the utility of the five-factor model of personality (FFM) as a predictor of an individual's performance on the job.

  • Journal article
    Research Profile - Jennifer Barbour
    Barbour, Jennifer (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)
  • Journal article
    The extent of personality change: Rank order consistency, mean level change, individual level change, and ipsative stability
    Gordon, Jessie (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    An individual's traits do not necessarily remain at a fixed strength throughout their lifespan. Consequently, contemporary psychologists debate the extent to which personality changes over time. Focusing on contemporary literature, this essay uses trait consistency to address personality changes and is divided into four comprehensive definitions of personality continuity or change: rank order consistency, mean level change, individual level change, and ipsative stability. Both rank order consistency and mean level change, appeared to consistently increase and develop in relation to the population across the adult lifespan. Both the magnitude of individual level change and ipsative stability exhibited predictable consistency in relation to maturity development rather than age.

  • Journal article
    Research Profile - Claire Hitchings
    Hitchings, Claire (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)
  • Journal article
    List of Contributors
    Biggs, Amanda (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    The Editor would like to thank the people who have participated in the development of this issue, either by contributing their work, reviewing articles, or inviting students to submit their work.

  • Journal article
    Editor's note
    Biggs, Amanda (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    Welcome to the first issue of the Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal.

  • Journal article
    Intergroup commensality and conflict: Altering perceptions of intergroup relations
    Sheeran, Nicola (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    The primary aim of the current study was to explore the relationship between intergroup food sharing, conflict, and perceptions of intergroup relations.

  • Journal article
    The role of rationality and bias in worldview relevant decisions under mortality salience
    McDowell, Michelle E. (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    The aim of the present thesis was to examine the effects of a motivated state called mortality salience on bias in information processing and decision-making within the Terror Management Theory (TMT; Greenberg, Pyszczynski & Soloman, 1986 ; Solomon, Greenberg & Pyszczynski, 1998) paradigm.

  • Journal article
    Promoting breast awareness in a female university sample: An application of the theory of planned behaviour with an implementation intentions intervention
    Kaya Beinke (Griffith University Undergraduate Psychology Journal, 2009)

    This project had a number of aims. The first was to evaluate the usefulness of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in predicting intention to engage in breast awareness (BA) and later BA behaviour of females under 40. Second, this project evaluated the efficacy of an implementation intentions intervention aiming to increase BA behaviour in the younger population. Finally, the study also aimed to compare BA intention and behaviour of undergraduate psychology and nursing students.