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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Gerardo A
dc.contributor.authorYanez-Arenas, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Billie J
dc.contributor.authorChen, Carla
dc.contributor.authorPlowright, Raina K
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Rebecca J
dc.contributor.authorSkerratt, Lee F
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-18T01:25:29Z
dc.date.available2019-03-18T01:25:29Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2352-7714
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.onehlt.2016.07.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100314
dc.description.abstractHendra virus is a paramyxovirus of Australian flying fox bats. It was first detected in August 1994, after the death of 20 horses and one human. Since then it has occurred regularly within a portion of the geographical distribution of all Australian flying fox (fruit bat) species. There is, however, little understanding about which species are most likely responsible for spillover, or why spillover does not occur in other areas occupied by reservoir and spillover hosts. Using ecological niche models of the four flying fox species we were able to identify which species are most likely linked to spillover events using the concept of distance to the niche centroid of each species. With this novel approach we found that 20 out of 27 events occur disproportionately closer to the niche centroid of two species (P. alecto and P. conspicillatus). With linear regressions we found a negative relationship between distance to the niche centroid and abundance of these two species. Thus, we suggest that the bioclimatic niche of these two species is likely driving the spatial pattern of spillover of Hendra virus into horses and ultimately humans.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom115
dc.relation.ispartofpageto121
dc.relation.ispartofjournalOne Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical microbiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3207
dc.titleClimatic suitability influences species specific abundance patterns of Australian flying foxes and risk of Hendra virus spillover
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRoberts, Billie J.


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