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dc.contributor.authorStork, Nigel E
dc.contributor.authorMcBroom, James
dc.contributor.authorGely, Claire
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Andrew J
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-09T00:01:37Z
dc.date.available2018-11-09T00:01:37Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1502408112
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100343
dc.description.abstractIt has been suggested that we do not know within an order of magnitude the number of all species on Earth [May RM (1988) Science 241(4872):1441–1449]. Roughly 1.5 million valid species of all organisms have been named and described [Costello MJ, Wilson S, Houlding B (2012) Syst Biol 61(5):871–883]. Given Kingdom Animalia numerically dominates this list and virtually all terrestrial vertebrates have been described, the question of how many terrestrial species exist is all but reduced to one of how many arthropod species there are. With beetles alone accounting for about 40% of all described arthropod species, the truly pertinent question is how many beetle species exist. Here we present four new and independent estimates of beetle species richness, which produce a mean estimate of 1.5 million beetle species. We argue that the surprisingly narrow range (0.9–2.1 million) of these four autonomous estimates—derived from host-specificity relationships, ratios with other taxa, plant:beetle ratios, and a completely novel body-size approach—represents a major advance in honing in on the richness of this most significant taxon, and is thus of considerable importance to the debate on how many species exist. Using analogous approaches, we also produce independent estimates for all insects, mean: 5.5 million species (range 2.6–7.8 million), and for terrestrial arthropods, mean: 6.8 million species (range 5.9–7.8 million), which suggest that estimates for the world’s insects and their relatives are narrowing considerably.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom7519
dc.relation.ispartofpageto7523
dc.relation.ispartofissue24
dc.relation.ispartofjournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
dc.relation.ispartofvolume112
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode059999
dc.titleNew approaches narrow global species estimates for beetles, insects, and terrestrial arthropods
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMcBroom, James
gro.griffith.authorStork, Nigel E.
gro.griffith.authorGely, Claire


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