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dc.contributor.authorBartleet, Brydie-Leigh
dc.contributor.authorSunderland, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorCarfoot, Gavin
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-30T05:23:08Z
dc.date.available2017-11-30T05:23:08Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1321-103X
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1321103X16667863
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100351
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the potential for music making activities such as jamming, song writing, and performance to act as a medium for intercultural connection and relationship building during service learning programs with Indigenous communities in Australia. To set the context, the paper begins with an overview of current international perspectives on service learning and then moves towards a theoretical and practical discussion of how these processes, politics, and learning outcomes arise when intercultural engagement is used in service learning programs. The paper then extends this discussion to consider the ways in which shared music making can bring a sense of intercultural “proximity” that has the potential to evoke deep learning experiences for all involved in the service learning activity. These learning experiences arise from three different “facings” in the process of making music together: facing others together; facing each other; facing ourselves. In order to flesh out how these theoretical ideas work in practice, the article draws on insights and data from Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University’s award winning Winanjjikari Service Learning Program, which has been running in partnership with Barkly Regional Arts and Winanjjikari Music Centre in Tennant Creek since 2009. This program involves annual service learning trips where university music students travel to Central Australia to work alongside Aboriginal and non-Indigenous musicians and artists on a range of community-led projects. By looking at the ways in which shared music making brings participants in this program “face to face”, we explore how this proximity leads to powerful learning experiences that foster mutual appreciation, relationship building, and intercultural reconciliation.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalResearch Studies in Music Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPerforming Arts and Creative Writing not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPerforming Arts and Creative Writing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode190499
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1904
dc.titleEnhancing intercultural engagement through service learning and music making with Indigenous communities in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland Conservatorium
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSunderland, Naomi L.
gro.griffith.authorBartleet, Brydie-Leigh


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