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dc.contributor.authorCleary, Grainne P
dc.contributor.authorParsons, Holly
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Bill R
dc.contributor.authorJones, Darryl N
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Kelly K
dc.contributor.authorWeston, Michael A
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-19T05:56:38Z
dc.date.available2018-01-19T05:56:38Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0150899
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100628
dc.description.abstractPrivate gardens provide habitat and resources for many birds living in human-dominated landscapes. While wild bird feeding is recognised as one of the most popular forms of human-wildlife interaction, almost nothing is known about the use of bird baths. This citizen science initiative explores avian assemblages at bird baths in private gardens in south-eastern Australia and how this differs with respect to levels of urbanisation and bioregion. Overall, 992 citizen scientists collected data over two, four-week survey periods during winter 2014 and summer 2015 (43% participated in both years). Avian assemblages at urban and rural bird baths differed between bioregions with aggressive nectar-eating species influenced the avian assemblages visiting urban bird baths in South Eastern Queensland, NSW North Coast and Sydney Basin while introduced birds contributed to differences in South Western Slopes, Southern Volcanic Plains and Victorian Midlands. Small honeyeaters and other small native birds occurred less often at urban bird baths compared to rural bird baths. Our results suggest that differences between urban versus rural areas, as well as bioregion, significantly influence the composition of avian assemblages visiting bird baths in private gardens. We also demonstrate that citizen science monitoring of fixed survey sites such as bird baths is a useful tool in understanding large-scale patterns in avian assemblages which requires a vast amount of data to be collected across broad areas.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciences
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0150899-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe0150899-12
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Monitoring
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050206
dc.titleAvian Assemblages at Bird Baths: A Comparison of Urban and Rural Bird Baths in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Cleary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJones, Darryl N.


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