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dc.contributor.authorBehrendorff, Linda
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Luke K-P
dc.contributor.authorMcKinnon, Allan
dc.contributor.authorHanger, Jon
dc.contributor.authorBelonje, Grant
dc.contributor.authorTapply, Jenna
dc.contributor.authorJones, Darryl
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Benjamin L
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-18T04:26:38Z
dc.date.available2018-01-18T04:26:38Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep23469
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100664
dc.description.abstractTop-predators play stabilising roles in island food webs, including Fraser Island, Australia. Subsidising generalist predators with human-sourced food could disrupt this balance, but has been proposed to improve the overall health of the island’s dingo (Canis lupus dingo) population, which is allegedly ‘starving’ or in ‘poor condition’. We assess this hypothesis by describing the diet and health of dingoes on Fraser Island from datasets collected between 2001 and 2015. Medium-sized mammals (such as bandicoots) and fish were the most common food items detected in dingo scat records. Stomach contents records revealed additional information on diet, such as the occurrence of human-sourced foods. Trail camera records highlighted dingo utilisation of stranded marine fauna, particularly turtles and whales. Mean adult body weights were higher than the national average, body condition scores and abundant-excessive fat reserves indicated a generally ideal-heavy physical condition, and parasite loads were low and comparable to other dingo populations. These data do not support hypotheses that Fraser Island dingoes have restricted diets or are in poor physical condition. Rather, they indicate that dingoes on Fraser Island are capable of exploiting a diverse array of food sources which contributes to the vast majority of dingoes being of good-excellent physical condition.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Macmillan
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom23469-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto23469-12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScientific Reports
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Monitoring
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050206
dc.titleInsects for breakfast and whales for dinner: the diet and body condition of dingoes on Fraser Island (K'gari)
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s). 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJones, Darryl N.


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