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dc.contributor.authorWang, Yi
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Wen-hua
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhi
dc.contributor.authorWei, Xin-hua
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Xin-qing
dc.contributor.authorNeumann, David L
dc.contributor.authorShum, David HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Eric FC
dc.contributor.authorChan, Raymond CK
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:34:32Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:34:32Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00133
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100694
dc.description.abstractImpairment in empathy has been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia and individuals with psychosis proneness. In the present study, we examined the neural correlates underlying theory of mind (ToM) and empathy and the relationships between these two social cognitive abilities with schizotypy. Fifty-six first-year college students (31 males, 25 females) between 17 and 21 years of age (M = 19.3, SD = 0.9) from a medical university in China participated. All participants undertook a comic strips functional imaging task that specifically examined both empathy and ToM. In addition, they completed two self-report scales: the Chapman Psychosis Proneness scale and the Interpersonal Responsivity Index (IRI). Results showed that both empathy and ToM conditions of the task were associated with brain activity in the middle temporal gyrus, the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), the precuneus and the posterior cingulate gyrus. In addition, we found positive correlations between negative schizotypy and brain activity in regions involved in social cognition, namely, the middle temporal gyrus, the TPJ, as well as the medial prefrontal gyrus. These findings highlight that different dimensions of schizotypy may show different associations with brain regions involved in social cognitive abilities. More importantly, the positive correlation between brain activity and anhedonia suggests the presence of compensatory mechanisms in high-risk populations.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom133-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto133-9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
dc.relation.ispartofvolume9
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNeurosciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1109
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleDimensional schizotypy and social cognition: An fMRI imaging study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Wang, Liu, Li, Wei, Jiang, Neumann, Shum, Cheung and Chan. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorShum, David
gro.griffith.authorNeumann, David L.
gro.griffith.authorChan, Raymond


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