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dc.contributor.authorCarey, Gemma
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Catherine
dc.contributor.editorEddy K. M. Chong
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T12:00:40Z
dc.date.available2017-11-27T12:00:40Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100793
dc.description.abstractOver some decades now, education scholars have clearly delineated the characteristics of transformative pedagogy—student-oriented, flexible, responsive, explorative, context-rich, and have equally clearly and convincingly argued for the potential of this approach to improve learning outcomes in students. With the attention of music education scholars and practitioners now turning to implementing and cultivating the transformative approach in the one-to-one music studio environment, it is becoming increasingly important to better understand specific behaviours, strategies, interventions that together result in a transformative approach to teaching. This article reports on part of a larger project on transformative pedagogy in the studio one-to-one tertiary music environment, which aims to improve the education of the professional musician-in-making by fostering transformative approaches to teaching and learning. The article offers a nested case study of one teacher whose pedagogical approach was identified, in advance of this study, as predominantly transformative. Using video-recorded lessons as prompts, the authors explore transformative behaviours and strategies as manifest in the approach of this teacher, inviting reflections of the teacher herself on what, specifically, transformative teaching looks like in the context of her music studio. Themes range from the importance of pedagogical agility in adapting and responding to the student and situation at hand, to methods of fostering student ownership of lessons and learning, to building a relationship of confidence and trust with the student. In this way, this brief case study offers one example of how transformative teaching and learning may be enacted in the music studio. It argues that particularly in those situations where exemplary teaching practices are shared among colleagues, such pedagogy constitutes a form of leadership-in-action, as the benefits roll out to other teachers and, crucially, teachers-to-be—that is, students. The authors hope its findings will inform and support the aspirations of teachers and institutions to foster transformative pedagogical approaches to one-to-one music teaching and learning.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherInternational Society for Music Education (ISME)
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.isme.org/events
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameISME CEPROM 2016
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the 21st International Seminar of the ISME Commission on the Education of the Professional Musician
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2016-07-20
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2016-07-23
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSt Andrews, Scotland, United Kingdom
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPerforming Arts and Creative Writing not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode190499
dc.titleEnacting transformative pedagogy in the music studio: A case study of responsive, relational teaching
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland Conservatorium
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 ISME. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner[s] for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher’s website or contact the author[s].
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCarey, Gemma M.
gro.griffith.authorGrant, Catherine F.


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