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dc.contributor.authorTartaglia, Gianluca M.
dc.contributor.authorTadakamadla, Santosh Kumar
dc.contributor.authorFornari, Claudia Debora
dc.contributor.authorCorti, Eleonora
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Stephan Thaddeus
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-16T12:30:32Z
dc.date.available2017-10-16T12:30:32Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1742-5247
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17425247.2017.1260118
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/100957
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Poor oral hygiene is a major risk factor for oral diseases. Regular home-based care is essential to maintain good oral hygiene. In particular, mouthrinses can support conventional tooth brushing in reducing accumulation of oral plaque. Areas covered: The most common molecules contained in mouthrinses (chlorhexidine, essential oils, cetyl pyridinium chloride, triclosan, octeneidine, delmopinol, polyvinylpyrrolidone, hyaluronic acid, natural compounds) are discussed, together with relevant clinical and in vitro studies, focusing on their effects on periodontal health. Currently, chlorhexidine is the most efficacious compound, with both antiplaque and antibacterial activities. Similar results are reported for essential oils and cetyl pyridinium chloride, although with a somewhat reduced efficacy. Considering the adverse effects of chlorhexidine and its time-related characteristics, this molecule may best be indicated for acute/short-term use, while essential oils and cetyl pyridinium chloride may be appropriate for long-term, maintenance treatment. Expert opinion: The literature has not clearly demonstrated which compound is the best for mouthrinses that combine good efficacy and acceptable side effects. Research should focus on substances with progressive antibacterial activity, prompting a gradual change in the composition of oral biofilm and mouthrinses that combine two or more molecules acting synergistically in the mouth.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalExpert Opinion on Drug delivery
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDentistry not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPharmacology and pharmaceutical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3214
dc.titleMouthwashes in the 21st century: a narrative review about active molecules and effectiveness on the periodontal outcomes
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Taylor & Francis. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery on 20 Nov 2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17425247.2017.1260118
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTadakamadla, Santosh Kumar


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