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dc.contributor.authorHomel, Jacqueline B
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T22:01:32Z
dc.date.available2019-09-09T22:01:32Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn0004-9530
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ajpy.12002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101036
dc.description.abstractThis study uses a three‐wave longitudinal study of young Australians to identify developmental processes underlying the relationship between school bullying and physical aggression in early adulthood. The central question is whether and how drinking and participation in work or university study disrupt or entrench aggressive pathways from school bullying to adult aggression. Self‐report data were collected from 88 females and 63 males (N = 151) during childhood (age 10), adolescence (age 14), and early adulthood (age 20). Participants who bullied other students during childhood and adolescence, or during adolescence only, reported more physical aggression during early adulthood than those who never bullied. However, those who had bullied during adolescence only reported significantly higher adult aggression if they were also drinking at above‐average frequencies. Conversely, participation in university, compared to being in the workforce, was associated with significantly less adult aggression among the at‐risk groups. Findings suggest that particular contexts during early adulthood can offer youth on aggressive trajectories (as evidenced by bullying at school) unique opportunities to turn their behaviour around. Other contexts, however, may exacerbate aggressive behaviour patterns.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherThe Australian Psychological Society
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom98
dc.relation.ispartofpageto106
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume65
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDevelopmental Psychology and Ageing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCauses and Prevention of Crime
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170102
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160201
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleDoes bullying others at school lead to adult aggression? The roles of drinking and university participation during the transition to adulthood
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Australian Psychological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Does bullying others at school lead to adult aggression? The roles of drinking and university participation during the transition to adulthood, Australian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 65, Iss. 2, June 2013, Pages 98-106, which has been published in final form at 10.1111/ajpy.12002. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHomel, Jacqueline B.


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