Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJeffries, Samantha
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T06:04:20Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T06:04:20Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2075-471X
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/laws5010014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101073
dc.description.abstractThis paper outlines why domestic violence (or more specifically, coercive control) should be crucial to child custody proceedings. What is known about parenting in the context of coercively controlling violence, and what the legislation directs courts to consider, is juxtaposed with the actuality of court decision making. Current knowledge about the recognition of domestic violence in judicial practice is overviewed, drawing particular attention to the role of the “expert” family assessment in determinations of a child’s “best interests”. A comprehensive synopsis of the existing research on these “expert” reports in Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States is provided. It is concluded that, in court proceedings the reality of living with coercively controlling violence and the potential on-going risks it poses to children and non-abusive parents, is typically negated. Instead, “best interests” considerations prioritise the maintenance of perpetrator/child relationships, and thus “abuser’s rights” over victim safety. Judicial officers are not experts in domestic violence and they can only make decisions on the basis of the evidence before them, the assessments made by the “experts” likely play an important role in best interest considerations. Of concern is current research that calls into serious question the expertise of these “experts” when it comes to proceedings involving allegations of coercively controlling violence.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPIAG
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom14-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto14-17
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalLaws
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titleIn the Best Interests of the Abuser: Coercive Control, Child Custody Proceedings and the “Expert” Assessments That Guide Judicial Determinations
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governance
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 by the author; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons by Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJeffries, Samantha J.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record