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dc.contributor.authorJeffries, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorField, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorMenih, Helena
dc.contributor.authorRathus, Zoe
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-25T21:44:01Z
dc.date.available2018-04-25T21:44:01Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0313-0096en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101074
dc.description.abstractCases involving families where there are allegations of domestic violence constitute a significant part of family court caseloads in Australia.1 Research undertaken by the Australian Institute of Family Studies showed that allegations of spousal violence occurred in over 51 per cent of litigated cases, with the figure rising to over 70 per cent of cases not judicially determined.2 These are complex and difficult cases often filled with allegations and counter-allegations.3 A critical piece of evidence often obtained in these cases is a family assessment report (a ‘family report’), which is prepared by a family consultant, usually a social worker or psychologist. A recent evaluation showed that family reports are increasingly being obtained in cases involving allegations of domestic violence or abuse, with a rise from one-third in the pre-reform cases reviewed to just over half post-reform.4 This suggests that family report writers have a critical role to play in how the family law system deals with allegations of domestic violence in parenting cases. However, Australian research in this area is currently limited. In this article, we report findings from a focus group study that formed part of an Australian pilot research project exploring family report writer practice in contexts of domestic violence.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherThe University of New South Wales Law Journalen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.unswlawjournal.unsw.edu.au/issue/volume-39-no-4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1355en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1388en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalUNSW Law Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.titleGood Evidence, Safe Outcomes in Parenting Matters Involving Domestic Violence? Understanding Family Report Writing Practice from the Perspective of Professionals Working in the Family Law Systemen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governanceen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 University of New South Wales. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link to access the journal's website.en_US
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorJeffries, Samantha J.
gro.griffith.authorRathus, Zoe S.


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