Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Rebecca J
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Cate M
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Rod
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-31T12:30:42Z
dc.date.available2017-08-31T12:30:42Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013266
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101156
dc.description.abstractmorbidity and mortality attributable to traumatic injury using a population-based matched cohort in Australia. Setting: New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia, Australia. Participants: Individuals ≥18 years who had an injury-related hospital admission in 2009 formed the injured cohort. The non-injured comparison cohort was randomly selected from the electoral roll and was matched 1:1 on age, gender and postcode of residence at the date of the index injury admission of their matched counterpart. Primary outcome measures: Using linked emergency department presentation, hospital admission and mortality records from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010 for both the injured and noninjured cohorts, 12-month mortality and pre-index and post-index injury hospital service use was examined. Adjusted rate ratios and attributable risk were calculated. Results: There were 167 600 individuals injured in 2009 and admitted to hospital in New South Wales, South Australia or Queensland with a matched comparison. The injured cohort had 3 times higher proportion of having ≥1 comorbidity preinjury, higher preinjury hospital service use, and a higher 12-month mortality compared with a non-injured comparison group. The injured cohort had 2.20 (95% CI 2.12 to 2.28) times higher rate of hospital admissions in the 12 months post the index injury admission compared with the non-injured comparison cohort. Injury was a likely contributory factor in at least 55% of hospitalisations within 12 months of the index injury hospitalisation. Conclusions: Individuals who had an injury-related hospitalisation had higher mortality and are hospitalised at increased rates for many months postinjury. While comorbid conditions are significant, they do not account for the differences in outcomes. This study contributes to informing research efforts on better quantifying the attributable burden of hospitalised injury-related disability and mortality in Australia.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome013266-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe013266-9
dc.relation.ispartofissue12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMJ Open
dc.relation.ispartofvolume6
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Medical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1199
dc.titleQuantifying the hospitalised morbidity and mortality attributable to traumatic injury using a population-based matched cohort in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2016. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorCameron, Cate M.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record