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dc.contributor.authorChambers, Suzanne K
dc.contributor.authorBaade, Peter
dc.contributor.authorYoul, Philippa
dc.contributor.authorAitken, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorOcchipinti, Stefano
dc.contributor.authorVinod, Shalini
dc.contributor.authorValery, Patricia C
dc.contributor.authorGarvey, Gail
dc.contributor.authorFong, Kwun M
dc.contributor.authorBall, David
dc.contributor.authorZorbas, Helen
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Jeff
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Dianne L
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T04:58:20Z
dc.date.available2018-05-09T04:58:20Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.3829
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101380
dc.description.abstractObjective: Health-related stigma is associated with negative psychological and quality of life outcomes in lung cancer patients. Thisstudy describes the impact of stigma on lung cancer patients’ psychological distress and quality of life and explores the role of social constraints and illness appraisal as mediators of effect. Methods: A self-administered cross-sectional survey examined psychological distress and quality of life in 151 people (59% response rate) diagnosed with lung cancer from Queensland and New South Wales. Health-related stigma, social constraints and illness appraisals were assessed as predictors of adjustment outcomes. Results: Forty-nine percent of patients reported elevated anxiety; 41% were depressed; and 51% had high global distress. Health-related stigma was significantly related to global psychological distress and quality of life with greater stigma and shame related to poorer outcomes. These effects were mediated by illness appraisals and social constraints. Conclusions: Health-related stigma appears to contribute to poorer adjustment by constraining interpersonal discussions about cancer and heightening feelings of threat. There is a need for the development and evaluation of interventions to ameliorate the negative effects of health-related stigma among lung cancer patients.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1569
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1577
dc.relation.ispartofissue11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsycho-Oncology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume24
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesis
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titlePsychological distress and quality of life in lung cancer: The role of health-related stigma, illness appraisals and social constraints
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorOcchipinti, Stefano
gro.griffith.authorChambers, Suzanne K.
gro.griffith.authorYoul, Philippa
gro.griffith.authorBaade, Peter D.
gro.griffith.authorDunn, Jeffrey
gro.griffith.authorAitken, Joanne


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