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dc.contributor.authorDiedrich, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorGuzman, Gustavo
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-31T01:20:01Z
dc.date.available2018-08-31T01:20:01Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1367-3270
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JKM-02-2015-0055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101456
dc.description.abstractPurpose – This paper aims to examine the complexities emerging in the attempts to develop a sophisticated IT-based knowledge management system (KMS) for sharing knowledge. Using actor-network theory, the authors conceptualise this as continuous processes of translation, whereby heterogeneous human and non-human (e.g. technologies, methods and plans) elements are drawn together and mobilised to produce stable networks through associations between them. Design/methodology/approach – The case study method was adopted using a narrative approach that studies the ways of organising work in organisations. Shadowing, field notes, diary studies and participant observation were the main data collection methods used. Findings – The development and introduction of a KMS is a contingent and local process shaped by messy translations whereby the original idea, human and other non-human elements are reconfigured. By considering humans and non-humans symmetrically, the intended and unintended actions, and the role of unexpected events, this approach overcomes the deterministic view of human nature of the conventional KMS approaches. Research limitations/implications – A conceptual framework is presented as a means to improve the understanding of the complex associations emerging within networks of people, objects and machines during the development and introduction of KMS. Practical implications – The translation approach helps practitioners to consider their taken-for-granted assumptions about people, machines and the associations among them. This assists practitioners to uncover emerging conflicting issues between human and machines, among machines and among humans. Furthermore, this allows practitioners to recognise the different identities humans and non-humans take, overtime, as a result of emerging associations. Originality/value – The originality of this paper lies in the use of alternative conceptual lenses to understand KMS development and introduction as processes of translation. Additionally, rather than exploring the success stories, it focuses on a failed attempt to introduce a KMS
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1273
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1294
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Knowledge Management
dc.relation.ispartofvolume19
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInformation and Computing Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInformation and Computing Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCommerce, Management, Tourism and Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode089999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode08
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode15
dc.titleFrom implementation to appropriation: understanding knowledge management system development and introduction as a process of translation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Emerald. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorGuzman, Gustavo A.


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