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dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Kylie
dc.contributor.authorOwers, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-12T03:37:25Z
dc.date.available2017-10-12T03:37:25Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1747-0080
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1747-0080.12227
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101803
dc.description.abstractAim: Limited research exists on how consistently dietitians are identifying refeeding syndrome risk in hospitalised patients. We aimed to describe how consistent Australian and New Zealand dietitians are at identifying refeeding syndrome risk and compare their responses to the application of refeeding syndrome guidelines and patients' electrolyte levels and supplementation provided. Methods Dietitians from Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete an online survey. The survey inquired about demographics and asked respondents to classify the level of refeeding syndrome risk (i.e. none, some, high) in 13 case studies. Electrolytes and supplementation data were sourced from electronic patient records. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were conducted. Results: Two hundred and ninety-nine eligible people responded (33 ± 9 years, 95%F, 48% had ≥7 years of dietetic experience, 91% working clinically, 87% Australian). Respondents' answers were generally consistent and dietitians often reported the same level of refeeding syndrome risk as the application of NICE guidelines and patient electrolytes (49–98%). Respondents requested feedback on their responses, more detailed case information, and commented on factors that may influence their risk identification, including subsequent medical management and route of nutritional delivery. Conclusions: Dietitians were generally consistent in the identification of refeeding syndrome risk. Dietitians often reported similar levels of refeeding syndrome risk to those found with the application of refeeding guidelines and patient electrolytes and supplementation treatment. Evaluation of practice was valued by dietitians. Enhancing the evidence on which guidelines are based may improve translatability of guidelines to practice.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto7
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFood Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0908
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1111
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleConsistency of Australian and New Zealand dietitians' identification of refeeding syndrome risk and comparison with refeeding guidelines and patient electrolytes and supplementation treatment
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Consistency of Australian and New Zealand dietitians' identification of refeeding syndrome risk and comparison with refeeding guidelines and patient electrolytes and supplementation treatment, Nutrition & Dietetics, Volume 73, Issue 4, September 2016, Pages 369–375, which has been published in final form at 10.1111/1747-0080.12227. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMatthews, Kylie L.


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