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dc.contributor.authorRae, S
dc.contributor.authorHunn, M
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-12T12:30:42Z
dc.date.available2018-11-12T12:30:42Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1715-720X
dc.identifier.doi10.18438/B80C76
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/101844
dc.description.abstractObjectives – Literature supports the concept that embedding academic and information literacy support into first year university courses enables students to proceed more confidently with researching and writing their assignments, and thus contributes to student success in their course. A need was identified for academic and information literacy support for a cohort of first year business students as part of the development of online course content for Griffith Online, the institution’s online study degree option. This led to a collaboration between information literacy librarians, learning skills advisers, educational designers, and academic course convenors to develop and implement online resources. This paper will present findings on the impact of these online resources. Methods – Drawing on measures and methods identified in ISO16439 “Information and documentation: Methods and procedures for assessing the impact of libraries” (International Organisation for Standardization, 2014), in conjunction with the indicators offered by Lizzio’s (2006) Five Senses of Success framework, evidence was collected and combined from a variety of sources over semester 2, 2014, and semester 1, 2015 to assess the impact of the online resource. Inferred evidence was gathered from usage statistics (number of hits on the sites) and from performance measures (comparing student essay grade between those that did and did not use the resource). Solicited evidence was gathered from a survey of students, students in focus groups, and interviews with course lecturers, tutors and other stakeholders. Results – The inferred evidence showed a positive impact on the student success indicators of the sense of resourcefulness, capability, connection, purpose and identity. The solicited evidence suggests that students saw the online resource in a positive light and that staff were happy with the impact it had on students’ work and learning. It is believed that the gathered evidence indicates the Module did achieve the impact objective of a positive impact on the contribution to student success for these first year business students. Conclusions – The evidence has shown that this resource contributed to student success, and that staff and student satisfaction with the resource contributed to increased confidence with student academic skills and information literacy in respect to their assignment task. Assessing the impact of the online resource on student success has helped to demonstrate the value of the library at Griffith University to the wider community. The four-pronged collaboration relationship required for this approach was fostered with stakeholders outside of the library.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Alberta Learning Services
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom95
dc.relation.ispartofpageto112
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEvidence Based Library and Information Practice
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLibrary and Information Studies not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLibrary and Information Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode080799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0807
dc.titleAssessing the impact of embedding online academic and information literacy resources into a first year business course
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncsa/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyInformation Services, Information Services
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Rae and Hunn. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons-Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike License 4.0 International (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncsa/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly attributed, not used for commercial purposes, and, if transformed, the resulting work is redistributed under the same or similar license to this one.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRae, Sandy K.
gro.griffith.authorHunn, Margaret


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