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dc.contributor.authorWaghorn, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.authorDias, Shannon
dc.contributor.authorGladman, Beverley
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Meredith
dc.contributor.authorSaha, Sukanta
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-31T01:58:56Z
dc.date.available2018-07-31T01:58:56Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0045-0766
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1440-1630.12148
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/103669
dc.description.abstractBackground/aim: The Individual Placement and Support (IPS) approach is an evidence-based form of supported employment for people with severe and persistent mental illness. This approach is not yet widely available in Australia even though there is mounting evidence of its generalisability outside the USA. One previous Australian randomised controlled trial found that IPS is effective for young people with first episode psychosis. The aim of the current trial was to assess the effectiveness of evidencebased supported employment when implemented for Australian adult consumers of public mental health services by utilising existing service systems. Methods: A four-site randomised control trial design (n = 208) was conducted in Brisbane (two sites), Townsville and Cairns. The intervention consisted of an IPS supported employment service hosted by a community mental health team. The control condition was delivered at each site by mental health teams referring consumers to other disability employment services in the local area. Results: At 12 months, those in the IPS condition had 2.4 times greater odds of commencing employment than those in the control condition (42.5% vs. 23.5%). The conditions did not differ on secondary employment outcomes including job duration, hours worked, or job diversity. Attrition was higher than expected in both conditions with 28.4% completing the baseline interview but taking no further part in the study. Conclusion: The results support previous international findings that IPS-supported employment is more effective than non-integrated supported employment. IPS can be successfully implemented this way in Australia, but with a loss of effect strength compared to previous USA trials.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom424
dc.relation.ispartofpageto436
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
dc.relation.ispartofvolume61
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleA multi-site randomised controlled trial of evidence-based supported employment for adults with severe and persistent mental illness
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorWaghorn, Geoff R.


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