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dc.contributor.authorBoyd, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHunter, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMackie, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcTainsh, Granten_US
dc.contributor.authorPeat, J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T14:37:46Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T14:37:46Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-01T05:56:22Z
dc.identifier.issn15252027en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2006GC001404en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/11316
dc.description.abstractEolian dust is a source of iron for phytoplankton in many ocean areas, and there are complex pathways of atmospheric processing from soil to ocean. Overlooked parts of the pathways are the impact of large (>10 孩 grains (including a role as proxies for the behavior of smaller grains) and the effect of multiple cycles of uplift and abrasion in the dust source region. Partitioning (readily released, acid-leachable and refractory) and dissolution rates of iron were determined for an artificial dust (produced by abrading an Australian soil), untreated soil, abraded soil (after production of the artificial dust), and a natural Australian eolian dust sample taken during a dust storm. Readily released iron is not created during abrasion, and therefore the amount of readily released iron in a dust or dust-derived soil depends on processing events since the dust or soil last experienced an abrasion event. Our study develops a method for the partitioning of iron within airborne dusts and appears to be the first to consider the effect of multiple uplift events on iron partitioning.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAGU and the Geochemical Societyen_US
dc.publisher.placeWashington, U.S.A.en_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.agu.org/journals/gc/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto11en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue12en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (G3)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode260114en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode260399en_US
dc.titleSoil abrasion and eolian dust production: Implications for iron partitioning and solubilityen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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