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dc.contributor.authorDymock, Darryl
dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-29T03:38:57Z
dc.date.available2018-10-29T03:38:57Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/117243
dc.description.abstractBeyond the obvious acquisition of the three ‘R’s’—reading, writing and arithmetic—many other benefits derive from learning. Increases in self-esteem and confidence have often been cited as consistent, if unanticipated, outcomes of learning and have been achieved even when there has been limited gain in the competency being learned. Further, such confidence-building can have a positive impact on how and what an individual learns. While the measurement of objective competencies acquired through learning is well developed, the measurement of the wider benefits of learning is still in its infancy. This report by Darryl Dymock and Stephen Billett identifies the extent to which indicators might be developed for a range of learning outcomes in non-accredited community adult language, literacy and numeracy programs. It follows Dymock’s earlier work, Community adult language, literacy and numeracy provision in Australia: Diverse approaches and outcomes (NCVER, 2007), which attempted to gauge the extent of provision of this type of training in Australia. Key messages It is possible to assess the wider benefits of non-accredited adult language, literacy and numeracy learning. However, different types of assessment instruments, which cater for the diversity and complexity of learners’ needs, motivations and outcomes, are necessary. Special attention must be paid to the language adopted in the instruments so that these can be easily used by tutors and their students. Both learners and tutors derive personal and educational outcomes by participating in the process of assessing and acknowledging learning outcomes. Tutors in this field, many of whom are volunteers, are in need of professional development to fully understand the purpose and language of the assessment instruments. The right approach to assessment can build the self-confidence of students, many of whom are not suited to formal education settings.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNational Centre for Vocational Education Research
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttps://www.ncver.edu.au/research-and-statistics/publications/all-publications/assessing-and-acknowledging-learning-through-non-accredited-community-adult-language,-literacy-and-numeracy-programs
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto44
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode139999
dc.titleAssessing and acknowledging learning through non-accredited community adult language, literacy and numeracy programs
dc.typeReport
dc.type.descriptionU2 - Reviews/Reports
dc.type.codeD - Reviews/Reports
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2008 Australian Government. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the publisher’s website for further information.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBillett, Stephen R.
gro.griffith.authorDymock, Darryl


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