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dc.contributor.authorSmith, A
dc.contributor.authorBillett, S
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:12:56Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:12:56Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.date.modified2009-10-14T22:13:24Z
dc.identifier.issn1359-6748
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13596740500507821
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/11762
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, the debate over reform to national vocational education and training systems has shifted from a focus on the supply-side of VET - qualifications structures, national training schemes and institutional structures - to demand for training by industry and the role of employers in increasing the skills levels of the workforce. Yet, enhancing employer demands for training has proved to be a perennial problem for governments of all political complexions in the developed world. Approaches to securing enterprise investment in training by governments form a continuum from low-level intervention to compulsion and regulation, and range from approaches which attempt to secure voluntary commitment through to legislating enterprise expenditure on training (Billet & Smith 2005). Voluntary commitment is often seen as the most desirable and self-sustaining approach, but is difficult to secure from enterprises. As a result, governments have often experimented with policies of compulsion to make employers invest in training such as training levies. However, decisions about expenditure on training ultimately depend on individual employer's interests, values and commitments. Improving and enhancing employers' perceptions of the value of training are vital to increasing the levels of expenditure. This paper discusses the range of government approaches to encouraging employers to invest in training and development that are to be found in the developed world. It argues that compulsory employer levies are rarely successful and that increasing the level of investment in training by employers is more likely to be achieved through more subtle policy mechanisms.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent155663 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUK
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t716100718
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto18
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalResearch in Post-compulsory Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume11
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1301
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.titleMechanisms for enhancing employer investment in training: a comparative perspective
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2006 Taylor & Francis. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link to the publisher version. The author-version of this article will be available for download 18 months after publication.
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBillett, Stephen R.


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