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dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.editorMike Savageen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T19:33:59Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T19:33:59Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-02T05:24:57Z
dc.identifier.issn00380261en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-954X.2006.00613.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/11927
dc.description.abstractWarde's (1994) theoretical analysis of possible anxieties provoked in the act of consumption synthesises a large body of contemporary literature on uncertainty, social change and consumption. In doing so, it offers a predominantly structural model of the anxiety provoking tensions and forces individual consumers may be exposed to. Drawing on the work of contemporary figurehead theorists of social change, and proposing his own application of Durkheim's model of suicide to the problem of consumption anxiety, Warde presents a model of how anxieties and their mitigation are embedded within configurations of contemporary consumer culture. Though Warde's analysis illustrates the structural, theoretical context of potential consumption anxieties for particular social groups, it is unable to specify how such anxieties are manifested and managed - or performed - by individuals within specific social and consumption settings. This paper takes an interpretive approach, conceptualising consumption anxiety as a discursive, narrative phenomenon likely to surface within particular social settings that are conducive to generating expressions of anxiety. The paper also considers the relation between narrativisation and objects, arguing that the cultural capacity of objects must be understood within local settings where objects are afforded a capacity to act through various discourses. The argument is drawn using selections of face-to-face interview data collected from a sample of middle-class householders on the practice of home decoration.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent114505 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeOxforden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117976052/homeen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom263en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto282en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThe Sociological Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume54en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370199en_US
dc.titleInvestigating consumption anxiety thesis: aesthetic choice, narrativisation and social performanceen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciencesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2006 Blackwell Publishing. The definitive version is available at [www.blackwell-synergy.com.]en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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