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dc.contributor.convenorJim Joseen_AU
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Marteenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHowes, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.editorJim Joseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:18:11Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:18:11Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-15T21:42:17Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.newcastle.edu.au/school/ept/politics/apsa/abstractsandpapers.htmlen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/12021
dc.description.abstractThe provision of safe and reliable energy is essential for the development of a modern economy and has been the prime goal of domestic energy policy. There are, however, many remote communities in Australia that lack access to a conventional electricity grid but are well placed to take advantage of viable alternatives. In these situations the deployment of renewable energy systems would not only solve the electricity supply problems but would also assist in achieving environmental policy goals by cutting net greenhouse gas emissions and moving communities closer to sustainable development. The utilisation of these alternatives also offers an interesting laboratory to test the theoretical framework of ecological modernisation that underpins environmental policies. Despite their many benefits, the uptake of renewable energy systems in remote communities often remains curiously low. This paper investigates the barriers to change by analysing some of the political, economic and social factors that have been at work. The results provide some useful findings, particularly with regards to the need for effective community engagement in successful policy implementation.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent114073 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralasian Political Studies Associationen_US
dc.publisher.placeNewcastle, Australiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.auspsa.org.au/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAustralasian Political Studies Association Annual Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleAPSA Conference, Newcastle 2006en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2006-09-25en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2006-09-27en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationUniversity of Newcastle, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360201en_US
dc.titleRemote Renewable Energy in Australia: Barriers to Uptake and the Community Engagement Imperativeen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyAn Unassigned Group, An Unassigned Departmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2006 Australasian Political Studies Association (APSA). Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Use hypertext link to access conference website.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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