Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-18T03:47:48Z
dc.date.available2019-06-18T03:47:48Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.issn02601370
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0260137970160602
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/120926
dc.description.abstractPopulation ageing and growing competition for limited resources are likely to increase the onus on older adults to maximize their own well‐being. Recent literature speculates that it may be possible for older people to improve, or at least maintain, aspects of their health by engaging in stimulating mental activity. If that is the case, self‐funding adult education organizations like the University of the Third Age (U3A) are contributing, not only to the well‐being of members, but also to the national economy. U3A has grown strongly in Australia and New Zealand in recent years, and the value of its voluntary services to the community is calculated to be more than A$3 million annually. Despite their present rapid growth, the independent U3A groups may need to develop a more outward‐looking focus if they are to continue to meet the needs of existing members, and to provide different kinds of intellectually challenging programmes for newer ageing cohorts. One practical way of doing this would be through electronic networking between the U3A groups and similar adult education organizations, as well as by using the limitless resources on the World Wide Web. However, the hardware for electronic communication is expensive and purchases of this nature would be beyond the immediate resources of most U3A groups. A mechanism is outlined by which U3As may be able to attract one‐off funding for the purchase of computers or other resources which could help them to meet their educational objectives.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.publisher.placeUK
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom474
dc.relation.ispartofpageto490
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Lifelong Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation Systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1301
dc.titleU3As in Australia and New Zealand: Their value to the wider community, and new directions for future developments
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studies
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorSwindell, Richard F.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record