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dc.contributor.authorJames Bailey, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-14T00:53:45Z
dc.date.available2019-05-14T00:53:45Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.issn1329878Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1329878X9708500117en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/121271
dc.description.abstractIn 1959·60 there were approximately 1200 country picture theatres in Australia, most of them run by independent exhibitors. Over 300 of chem were in Queensland and many were in remote small country towns (The Film Weekly Motion Picture Directory 1959-60 p.16). They screened three or four different Hollywood double features a week, newsreels, serials, cartoons and American travelogues. Who were these independent country exhibitors who provided arguably the most important cultural and social activity in the bush? How did the eight major Hollywood studios supply films all over Australia, including the remotest picture theatre in the outback? What can we learn from the way Hollywood culturally colonised Australia?en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Key Centre for Cultural and Media Policyen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom110en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto115en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMedia International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume85en_US
dc.titleIndependent Film Exhibition: Country Queensland from the 1930s to the 1960sen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, Queensland College of Arten_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorJames Bailey, Julie


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