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dc.contributor.authorHine, T.
dc.contributor.authorCook, M.
dc.contributor.authorRogers, G.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-03T05:34:32Z
dc.date.available2019-12-03T05:34:32Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.issn00315117en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/BF03211911en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/121540
dc.description.abstractThe spatial parameters underlying a novel illusion of relative motion are characterized. A simple stimulus composed of two sine-wave gratings was sufficient to generate the illusion. We measured the response of subjects to rapid, small-amplitude oscillations of this stimulus behind a fixation point. The effect was clearly strongest for acute angles between the gratings, but only when spatial frequency was between 6 and 11 cpd. We surmise that activity in the grating cells of the primate visual cortex (von der Heydt, Peterhans, & Dursteler, 1992) might be the cause of the illusion. The illusion is potentially an important tool in understanding how higher cortical areas combine disparate motion signals.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherPsychonomic Society Publicationsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUSAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom448en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto455en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPerception & Psychophysicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume59en_US
dc.titleThe Ouchi Illusion: An anomaly in the Perception of Rigid Motion for Limited Spatial Frequencies and Anglesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychologyen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorHine, Trevor J.


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