Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Heather
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-03T05:38:09Z
dc.date.available2019-12-03T05:38:09Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier.issn0313-0096en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/121577
dc.description.abstractThe Anunga guidelines attempt to regulate the conduct of police during their interrogation of Aboriginal suspects, with an aim to remove or obviate some of the disadvantages from which Aboriginal people suffer in their dealings with police. The guidelines of Anunga are critically examined, considering the implementation of four of its guidelines along with comments on the difficulties that have arisen in relation to the existing requirements.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherStar Printeryen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.unswlawjournal.unsw.edu.au/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom27en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto54en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalUniversity of New South Wales Law Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21en_US
dc.titleThe Cultural Specificity of Evidence: The Current Scope and Relevance of the Anunga Guidelinesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Lawen_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorDouglas, Heather A.


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record