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dc.contributor.authorFrance, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHomel, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.editorJohn Pratten_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:08:00Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:08:00Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2011-05-06T06:46:12Z
dc.identifier.issn00048658en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1375/acri.39.3.295en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/12302
dc.description.abstractCentral to pathways research is the analysis of the social processes involved in human action and the influences that have shaping qualities. At the heart of these social processes are human beings who exercise agency and help construct themselves and their environments. Shaping influences include changing social structures; political ideologies and policy innovations; and changes taking place in the cultural sphere of social life. In studying the actions of individuals within changing social environments it is important to make a distinction between individual developmental pathways and societal access routes. Access routes appear in different forms to different people in terms of accessibility and attractiveness. Understanding this perceptual dimension requires listening to the voices of children and young people.This is illustrated by reference to the work of the United Kingdom (UK) Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) research network, Pathways Into and Out of Crime, which shows how culture, structure and policy influence young people's everyday lives and decisions. It also shows that what young people really value is not programs but a supportive relationship with a nonjudgmental adult who is able to help them negotiate their way through difficult circumstances. The focus of prevention efforts should be on changing social arrangements to create opportunities and systems that facilitate the formation of such supportive structures.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent108630 bytes
dc.format.extent50908 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Academic Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeBowen Hills, Qlden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://anj.sagepub.com/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom295en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto309en_US
dc.relation.ispartofedition2006en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Criminologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume39en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390401en_US
dc.titleSocietal access routes and developmental pathways: Putting social structure and young people's voice into the analysis of pathways into and out of crimeen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2006 Australian Academic Press. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher, for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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