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dc.contributor.authorWoodfield, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorHall, Wayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorTansley, Geoffen_US
dc.contributor.editorAman Oo, Arun Patel, Tim Hilditch, Siva Chandranen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-20T12:00:38Z
dc.date.available2017-11-20T12:00:38Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/123540
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND OR CONTEXT: Griffith University has recently added the mechanical engineering discipline to its offerings in the School of Engineering. Within the school there is a vision to enhance student learning outcomes, engagement and improve retention through implementation of a student-focused learning approach. A range of project-based learning initiatives are to be implemented. These projects range from small embedded projects in traditional courses to wholly continuous assessment courses with a strong PBL focus. The third-year mechanical engineering heat and mass transfer course was developed using a design-and-build project as the central theme and was run for the first time in 2014. PURPOSE OR GOAL: This study is concerned with describing an innovative ‘double-pipe heat exchanger’ designand-build project, how it was used to introduce the concepts of heat transfer and how successful it was in terms of student performance in assessment items, student experience and alignment with course objectives. APPROACH: Rather than a completely ‘flipped classroom’, the developed course contained elements of a ‘chalk and talk’ approach with regular lectures scheduled along-side the main project activities. Moreover, regular tutorial questions were given to students during laboratory sessions, to complete whilst waiting for access to equipment. The project given to the students was to design and build a double-pipe heat exchanger to achieve the maximum steady-state heat transfer rate from hot water at 60 C flowing at a fixed rate of 1.2 L/min. Throughout the semester, as each of the key topics was introduced for heat and mass transfer, the double-pipe heat exchanger was used in the lecture as the starting point for discussion with illustrative example calculations. Students worked in groups but were required to write individual project reports. DISCUSSION: The course was well received by the students with 93% positive feedback on the overall student evaluations of the course (the remaining 7% was neither positive nor negative). The students enjoyed the course, engaged well with the project and performed well on all assessment items and exam questions connected to the themes of the project. RECOMMENDATIONS/IMPLICATIONS/CONCLUSION: This case study provides further evidence that inclusion of a strong running theme using an embedded project within a traditional ‘chalk and talk’ course can be an effective pedagogical approach without completely abandoning the traditional lecture/tutorial delivery model. The main merit of the embedded project was in providing a concrete, ‘hands-on’ experience of heat transfer processes which served as scaffolding for introduction of new concepts within the course material.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAustralasian Association for Engineering Education (AAEE)en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.aaee.net.au/index.php/conference/aaee-conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameAAEE 2015en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the 26th Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education (AAEE 2015)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2015-12-06en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2015-12-09en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationGeelong, Australiaen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchScience, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130212en_US
dc.titleImplementation of an Embedded Project-Based Learning Approach in an Undergraduate Heat Transfer Courseen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2015. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner[s] for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher’s website or contact the author[s].en_US
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gro.griffith.authorWoodfield, Peter L.
gro.griffith.authorHall, Wayne
gro.griffith.authorTansley, Geoff


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