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dc.contributor.authorEstivill-Castro, Vladimir
dc.contributor.editorL. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T04:41:46Z
dc.date.available2017-09-18T04:41:46Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/123589
dc.description.abstractIn our Foundations of Computing course, the aim is not only to teach some general aspects on how computers work (like binary notation), but also to enable students to truly comprehend notions like algorithm, technology, and even the notion of information to be able to exercise professional judgment. A fundamental exercise in the course is being able to convincingly understand and reproduce the Universal Turing Machine argument. We use a series of simulators that provide clear illustrations of how a computer works, commencing from very basic logic gates for hardware. We reach a point that the Turing Machine (TM) behavior and actions are very much the simulator of the von Neumann Machine describing the modern CPU. Therefore, a TM can emulate anything executable in a modern stored-program CPU. This exercise not only has the computability implications but also enables to represent other many issues of current computer systems, like virtualization, viruses or computation in the cloud. More importantly, we can introduce the philosophical argument of whether machines understand what they are doing, and in that regard whether they would be able to think.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherInternational Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED)en_US
dc.publisher.placeSpainen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://library.iated.org/view/ESTIVILLCASTRO2015CONen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameICERI 2015en_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle8th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation: Conference Proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2015-11-16
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2015-11-18
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSeville, Spainen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchScience, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130212en_US
dc.titleConcrete Simulators to Constructively Build Abstract Computability Concepts in First Year IT-Students and Enable the "Can Computers Think"en_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, School of Information and Communication Technologyen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 IATED. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the author[s].en_US
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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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