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dc.contributor.authorDeacon, Rebecca E
dc.contributor.authorBrough, Paula
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-08T03:48:31Z
dc.date.available2018-10-08T03:48:31Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn0004-9530
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ajpy.12119
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/123763
dc.description.abstractObjective: Preliminary evidence suggests veterinary nurses are an at-risk population for high levels of occupational stress. This study sought to advance knowledge of occupational stress in this under-researched professional group by applying the Job Demands–Resources model to assess predictors of psychological strain, work-related burnout, and work engagement. Method: Research participants consisted of 144 veterinary nurses employed within one Australian state (response rate of 41%). Data were obtained via an anonymous self-report questionnaire. All research participation was voluntary. Results: Analyses indicated the mean level of work-related burnout in this sample exceeded that of normative samples in human health-care professions. We also found that although both generic and occupation-specific job demands were significantly associated with levels of psychological strain and burnout, generic job demands accounted for a greater proportion of variance. Only direct effects were produced for the association of both workplace social support and job control with work engagement; no evidence was found for the moderating effects of these two job resources. Conclusions: The findings both validate and challenge the tenets of the Job Demands– Resources explanation of occupation stress. Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto9
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Psychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleVeterinary nurses' psychological well-being: The impact of patient suffering and death
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionPost-print
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.description.notepublicThis publication has been entered into Griffith Research Online as an Advanced Online Version.
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Australian Psychological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Veterinary nurses' psychological well‐being: The impact of patient suffering and death, Australian Journal of Psychology, Volume 69, Issue 2, Volume 69, Issue 2, Pages 77-85, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/ajpy.12119. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBrough, Paula
gro.griffith.authorDeacon, Rebecca E.


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