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dc.contributor.authorSurmon, L
dc.contributor.authorBialocerkowski, A
dc.contributor.authorHu, W
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T02:10:20Z
dc.date.available2017-07-18T02:10:20Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12909-016-0615-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/124021
dc.description.abstractBackground: The transition from university-based to clerkship-based education can be challenging. Medical schools have introduced strategies to ease the transition, but there has been no systematic review synthesizing the evidence on the perceptions of preparedness of medical students for their first clerkship to support these interventions. This study therefore aimed to (1) identify and synthesize the published evidence on medical students’ perceptions of preparedness for their first clerkship, and (2) identify factors that may impact on preparedness for clerkship, to better inform interventions aimed at easing this transition. Methods: Electronic databases (Medline, Journals@Ovid, CINAHL, ERIC, Web of Science, Embase) were searched without restriction and secondary searching of reference lists of included studies was also conducted. Included studies used quantitative or qualitative methodologies, involved medical students and addressed student/supervisor perceptions of preparedness for first clerkship. The first clerkship was defined as the first truly immersive educational experience during which the majority of learning was vocational and self-directed, as per the MeSH term ‘clinical clerkship’ and associated definition. Using an inductive thematic synthesis approach, 2 researchers independently extracted data, coded text (from results and discussion sections), and identified themes related to preparedness. Any disagreements were resolved by discussion and findings were then narratively synthesized. Results: The initial search identified 1214 papers. After removing duplicates and assessing abstracts and full articles against the inclusion criteria, 8 articles were included in the review. In general, the body of evidence was of sound methodological quality. Ten themes relating to perceptions of preparedness of medical students for their first clerkship were identified; competence, disconnection, links to the future, uncertainty, part of the team, time/workload, adjustment, curriculum, prior life experiences and learning. Conclusions: Eight of the ten themes related to perceptions of preparedness are potentially amenable to curricula strategies to improve the transition experience. The evidence supports clinical skills refreshers, clarification of roles and expectations, demystification of healthcare hierarchy and assessment processes and student-student handovers. Evidence also supports preclinical educational strategies such as enhancing content contextualization, further opportunities for the application of knowledge and skills, and constructive alignment of assessment tasks and pedagogical aims.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom89-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto89-11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Medical Education
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth services and systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedicine, nursing and health curriculum and pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4206
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3901
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390110
dc.titlePerceptions of preparedness for the first medical clerkship: a systematic review and synthesis
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 Surmon et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/ zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBialocerkowski, Andrea E.


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