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dc.contributor.authorCarey, David L.
dc.contributor.authorBlanch, Peter
dc.contributor.authorOng, Kok-Leong
dc.contributor.authorCrossley, Kay M.
dc.contributor.authorCrow, Justin
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Meg E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-07T00:26:20Z
dc.date.available2018-11-07T00:26:20Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0306-3674
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsports-2016-096309
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/124042
dc.description.abstractAims: To investigate whether a daily acute:chronic workload ratio informs injury risk in Australian football players; (2) to identify which combination of workload variable, acute and chronic time window best explains injury likelihood. Methods: Workload and injury data were collected from 53 athletes over 2 seasons in a professional Australian football club. Acute:chronic workload ratios were calculated daily for each athlete, and modelled against non-contact injury likelihood using a quadratic relationship. 6 workload variables, 8 acute time windows (2–9 days) and 7 chronic time windows (14–35 days) were considered (336 combinations). Each parameter combination was compared for injury likelihood fit (using R2). Results: The ratio of moderate speed running workload (18–24 km/h) in the previous 3 days (acute time window) compared with the previous 21 days (chronic time window) best explained the injury likelihood in matches (R2=0.79) and in the immediate 2 or 5 days following matches (R2=0.76–0.82). The 3:21 acute:chronic workload ratio discriminated between high-risk and low-risk athletes (relative risk=1.98–2.43). Using the previous 6 days to calculate the acute workload time window yielded similar results. The choice of acute time window significantly influenced model performance and appeared to reflect the competition and training schedule. Conclusions: Daily workload ratios can inform injury risk in Australian football. Clinicians and conditioning coaches should consider the sport-specific schedule of competition and training when choosing acute and chronic time windows. For Australian football, the ratio of moderate speed running in a 3-day or 6-day acute time window and a 21-day chronic time window best explained injury risk.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEngineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110604
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode09
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.titleTraining loads and injury risk in Australian football-differing acute: chronic workload ratios influence match injury risk
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© The authors 2017. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBlanch, Peter D.


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