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dc.contributor.authorFrakking, Thuy
dc.contributor.authorChang, Anne
dc.contributor.authorO'Grady, Kerry
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWeir, Kelly
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-15T01:59:41Z
dc.date.available2017-12-15T01:59:41Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0003-4894
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0003489416669953
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/124066
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cervical auscultation (CA) may be used to complement feeding/swallowing evaluations when assessing for aspiration. There are no published pediatric studies that compare the properties of sounds between aspirating and nonaspirating swallows. Aim: To establish acoustic and perceptual profiles of aspirating and nonaspirating swallow sounds and determine if a difference exists between these 2 swallowing types. Methods: Aspiration sound clips were obtained from recordings using CA simultaneously undertaken with videofluoroscopic swallow study. Aspiration was determined using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale. The presence of perceptual swallow/breath parameters was rated by 2 speech pathologists who were blinded to the type of swallow. Acoustic data between groups were compared using Mann Whitney U-tests, while perceptual differences were determined by a test of 2 proportions. Combinations of perceptual parameters of 50 swallows (27 aspiration, 23 no aspiration) from 47 children (57% male) were statistically analyzed using area under a receiver operating characteristic (aROC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values to determine predictors of aspirating swallows. Results: The combination of post-swallow presence of wet breathing and wheeze and absence of GRS and normal breathing was the best predictor of aspiration (aROC = 0.82, 95% CI, 0.70-0.94). There were no significant differences between these 2 swallow types for peak frequency, duration, and peak amplitude. Conclusion: Our pilot study has shown that certain characteristics of swallow obtained using CA may be useful in the prediction of aspiration. However, further research comparing the acoustic swallowing sound profiles of normal children to children with dysphagia (who are aspirating) on a larger scale is required.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1001
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1009
dc.relation.ispartofissue12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume125
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.titleAspirating and Nonaspirating Swallow Sounds in Children: A Pilot Study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorWeir, Kelly A.
gro.griffith.authorDavid, Michael


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