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dc.contributor.authorAlpert, Geoff
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T00:35:48Z
dc.date.available2018-11-20T00:35:48Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1745-9133en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1745-9133.12128en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/124920
dc.description.abstractRoutine police work brings officers in contact with all sorts of citizens, including those who exhibit bizarre behavior. Estimates of the nature and extent of those encounters are conflicting (see Cordner, 2006; Monahan, 1992; Morabito and Socia, 2015, this issue), but regardless of the correct numbers, it is generally accepted that a variety of problems involving those with mental illness are resolved by the police. We have learned that many citizens with mental illness also have alcohol and drug problems. For better or worse, the police are the frontline response to many citizens with mental illnesses and other conditions.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom277en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto283en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalCriminology & Public Policyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume14en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCriminology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160299en_US
dc.titlePolice Use of Force and the Suspect with Mental Illness: A Methodological Conundrumen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyOther, Otheren_US
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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