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dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Elliroma
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Chris J
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-08T04:43:00Z
dc.date.available2019-03-08T04:43:00Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0268-3946
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JMP-07-2012-0230
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/125028
dc.description.abstractPurpose: – Maverickism is the tendency of an individual to be socially competent, creative, goal focussed, risk-taking and disruptive. Previous research with the five-factor model (FFM) shows that individuals high in maverickism exhibit both functional and dysfunctional tendencies. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the descriptive FFM with the process-oriented hybrid model of learning in personality (HMLP), in the prediction of maverickism. Design/methodology/approach: – Employing a cross-sectional design with 490 full-time workers the authors use the NEO-International Personality Item Pool and the Learning Styles Profiler to examine differences in the FFM and HMLP in the prediction of maverickism. Findings: – Results with the FFM, identify extraversion, openness and (low) agreeableness as significant predictors of maverickism. All factors of the HMLP (except conscientious learning) significantly predict maverickism. Hierarchal regression analysis shows that the HMLP accounts for an additional 21 percent of variance in maverickism over and above that of the FFM. Research limitations/implications: – The authors have tested and built theory by identifying not only what predicts maverickism, but also how the learning processes of the HMLP interrelate to predict maverickism. Practical implications: – Managers interested in developing the maverick potential of their employees will find this study useful because it identifies what to look for in maverick workers. Social implications: – Individuals high in maverickism have the potential for radical innovation. Understanding how to identify and develop these individuals may lead to larger societal benefits. Originality/value: – The authors are the first to use the HMLP to test maverickism. The research highlights the importance of both personality and learning processes in maverickism.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom726
dc.relation.ispartofpageto740
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Managerial Psychology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume30
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBusiness and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titlePersonality and learning processes underlying maverickism
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorGardiner, Eliroma


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