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dc.contributor.authorCrilly, Julia
dc.contributor.authorKeijzers, Gerben
dc.contributor.authorTippett, Vivienne
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, John
dc.contributor.authorLind, James
dc.contributor.authorBost, Nerolie
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, Marilla
dc.contributor.authorShiels, Sue
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Marianne
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-28T02:56:37Z
dc.date.available2017-08-28T02:56:37Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1742-6731
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1742-6723.12399
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/125044
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe and compare characteristics and outcomes of patients who arrive by ambulance to the ED. We aimed to (i) compare patients with a delayed ambulance offload time (AOT) >30 min with those who were not delayed; and (ii) identify predictors of an ED length of stay (LOS) of >4 h for ambulance-arriving patients. Methods: A retrospective, multi-site cohort study was undertaken in Australia using 12 months of linked health data (September 2007–2008). Outcomes of AOT delayed and non-delayed presentations were compared. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify predictors of an ED LOS of >4 h. Results: Of the 40 783 linked, analysable ambulance presentations, AOT delay of >30 min was experienced by 15%, and 63% had an ED LOS of >4 h. Patients with an AOT <30 min had better outcomes for: time to triage; ambulance time at hospital; time to see healthcare professional; proportion seen within recommended triage time frame; and ED LOS for both admitted and non-admitted patients. In-hospital mortality did not differ. Strong predictors of an ED LOS >4 h included: hospital admission, older age, triage category, and offload delay >30 min. Conclusion: Patients arriving to the ED via ambulance and offloaded within 30 min experience better outcomes than those delayed. Given that offload delay is a modifiable predictor of an ED LOS of >4 h, targeted improvements in the ED arrival process for ambulance patients might be useful.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom216
dc.relation.ispartofpageto224
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEmergency Medicine Australasia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume27
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleImproved outcomes for emergency department patients whose ambulance off-stretcher time is not delayed
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.description.versionPublished
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorWallis, Marianne
gro.griffith.authorCrilly, Julia
gro.griffith.authorKeijzers, Gerben


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