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dc.contributor.authorHollings, Tracey
dc.contributor.authorMcCallum, Hamish
dc.contributor.authorKreger, Kaely
dc.contributor.authorMooney, Nick
dc.contributor.authorJones, Menna
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-25T22:31:18Z
dc.date.available2019-03-25T22:31:18Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2015.0124
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/125070
dc.description.abstractApex predators structure ecosystems through lethal and non-lethal interactions with prey, and their global decline is causing loss of ecological function. Behavioural changes of prey are some of the most rapid responses to predator decline and may act as an early indicator of cascading effects. The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), an apex predator, is undergoing progressive and extensive population decline, of more than 90% in long-diseased areas, caused by a novel disease. Time since local disease outbreak correlates with devil population declines and thus predation risk. We used hair traps and giving-up densities (GUDs) in food patches to test whether a major prey species of devils, the arboreal common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), is responsive to the changing risk of predation when they forage on the ground. Possums spend more time on the ground, discover food patches faster and forage more to a lower GUD with increasing years since disease outbreak and greater devil population decline. Loss of top–down effects of devils with respect to predation risk was evident at 90% devil population decline, with possum behaviour indistinguishable from a devil-free island. Alternative predators may help to maintain risk-sensitive anti-predator behaviours in possums while devil populations remain low.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherRoyal Society Publishing
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom20150124-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto20150124-9
dc.relation.ispartofissue1810
dc.relation.ispartofjournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
dc.relation.ispartofvolume282
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAgricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode069999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode07
dc.titleRelaxation of risk-sensitive behaviour of prey following disease-induced decline of an apex predator, the Tasmanian devil
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMcCallum, Hamish


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