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dc.contributor.authorWilson, B
dc.contributor.authorBialocerkowski, A
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-28T02:45:27Z
dc.date.available2017-08-28T02:45:27Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0124214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/125157
dc.description.abstractObjective: To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources: A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection: Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction: Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses: Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions: It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciences
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0124214-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe0124214-21
dc.relation.ispartofissue6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysiotherapy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110317
dc.titleThe effects of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle: Relevance to ankle sprains - A systematic review
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Rehabilitation Sciences
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Wilson, Bialocerkowski. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBialocerkowski, Andrea E.
gro.griffith.authorWilson, Brendan


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