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dc.contributor.authorBaroutsis, Aspa
dc.contributor.authorMills, Martin
dc.contributor.authorMcGregor, Glenda
dc.contributor.authorte Riele, Kitty
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Debra
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T01:30:46Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T01:30:46Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0141-1926
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/berj.3214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/125256
dc.description.abstractOpportunities for students to speak and to be heard are important elements of democratic schooling processes but research into student voice has shown that a culture of silence is a more common feature of schooling. Efforts to re‐engage young people in learning often recognise the importance of schooling processes that provide them with opportunities to participate meaningfully in schooling dialogues. This paper describes attempts to provide such opportunities for young people in an alternative school, who had been marginalised in mainstream schooling. Research was conducted over a period of 18 months, utilising a range of data collection methods, including interviews, observations, photography and the collection of artefacts, such as school documents. Drawing particularly on data related to a daily community forum, the paper explores how this routine afforded opportunities for student voice. The three‐part structure of the forum produced a range of effects, including: a discussion of issues related to local and wider community news as well as college announcements; a check‐in where each member of the community voiced their readiness (or otherwise) for the day's learning; and a sign‐up process that incorporated informed decision making about the day's learning sessions. It is argued that the intentions that underpin the community forum are important and relevant in all forms of schooling, not just alternative programmes, but these intentions can produce unintended effects.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.sponsorshipThe University of Queensland ARC
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom438
dc.relation.ispartofpageto453
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Educational Research Journal
dc.relation.ispartofvolume42
dc.relation.urihttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/ARC/DP120100620
dc.relation.grantIDDP120100620
dc.relation.fundersARC
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation policy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology of education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and pedagogy theory and development
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation systems
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390201
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390203
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390102
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3903
dc.titleStudent voice and the community forum: Finding ways of ‘being heard’ at an alternative school for disenfranchised young people
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2016 British Educational Research Association. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Student voice and the community forum: Finding ways of ‘being heard’ at an alternative school for disenfranchised young people, British Educational Research Journal, Vol.42(3), pp.438–453, 2016 which has been published in final form at DOI: 10.1002/berj.3214. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-20227.html#terms)
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMcGregor, Glenda V.
gro.griffith.authorBaroutsis, Aspa


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