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dc.contributor.authorAtwood, Trisha B
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, Rod M
dc.contributor.authorRitchie, Euan G
dc.contributor.authorLovelock, Catherine E
dc.contributor.authorHeithaus, Michael R
dc.contributor.authorHays, Graema C
dc.contributor.authorFourqurean, James W
dc.contributor.authorMacreadie, Peter I
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T01:30:31Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T01:30:31Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1758-678X
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nclimate2763
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/125324
dc.description.abstractPredators continue to be harvested unsustainably throughout most of the Earth's ecosystems. Recent research demonstrates that the functional loss of predators could have far-reaching consequences on carbon cycling and, by implication, our ability to ameliorate climate change impacts. Yet the influence of predators on carbon accumulation and preservation in vegetated coastal habitats (that is, salt marshes, seagrass meadows and mangroves) is poorly understood, despite these being some of the Earth's most vulnerable and carbon-rich ecosystems. Here we discuss potential pathways by which trophic downgrading affects carbon capture, accumulation and preservation in vegetated coastal habitats. We identify an urgent need for further research on the influence of predators on carbon cycling in vegetated coastal habitats, and ultimately the role that these systems play in climate change mitigation. There is, however, sufficient evidence to suggest that intact predator populations are critical to maintaining or growing reserves of 'blue carbon' (carbon stored in coastal or marine ecosystems), and policy and management need to be improved to reflect these realities.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1038
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1045
dc.relation.ispartofissue12
dc.relation.ispartofjournalNature Climate Change
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAtmospheric Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhysical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050299
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0401
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0406
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.titlePredators help protect carbon stocks in blue carbon ecosystems
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorConnolly, Rod M.


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