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dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Ben
dc.contributor.authorCecchin, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorJones, Ashleigh
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Gary
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, Chris
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-06T03:00:43Z
dc.date.available2017-07-06T03:00:43Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1526-484X
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/ijsnem.2014-0064
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/128717
dc.description.abstractThe addition of 25 mmol×L-1 sodium to low alcohol (2.3% ABV) beer has been shown to enhance post exercise fluid retention compared to full strength (4.8% ABV) beer with and without electrolyte modification. This investigation explored the effect of further manipulations to the alcohol and sodium content of beer on fluid restoration following exercise. Twelve male volunteers lost 2.03±0.19% body mass (mean±SD) using cycling-based exercise. Participants were then randomly allocated a different beer to consume on four separate occasions. Drinks included low alcohol beer with 25 mmol×L-1 of added sodium [LightBeer+25], low alcohol beer with 50 mmol×L-1 of added sodium [LightBeer+50], mid-strength beer (3.5% ABV) [Mid] or mid-strength beer with 25 mmol×L-1 of added sodium [Mid+25]. Total drink volumes in each trial were equivalent to 150% of body mass loss during exercise, consumed over a 1h period. Body mass, urine samples and regulatory hormones were obtained before and 4h after beverage consumption. Total urine output was significantly lower in the LightBeer+50 trial (1450±183 mL) compared to the LightBeer+25 (1796±284 mL), Mid+25 (1786±373 mL) and Mid (1986±304 mL) trials (all p<0.05). This resulted in significantly higher net body mass following the LightBeer+50 trial (-0.97±0.17kg) compared to all other beverages (LightBeer+25 (-1.30±0.24 kg), Mid+25 (-1.38±0.33 kg) and Mid (-1.58±0.29 kg), all p<0.05). No significant changes to aldosterone or vasopressin were associated with different drink treatments. The electrolyte concentration of low alcohol beer appears to have more significant impact on post exercise fluid retention than small changes in the alcohol content of beer.The addition of 25 mmol×L-1 sodium to low alcohol (2.3% ABV) beer has been shown to enhance post exercise fluid retention compared to full strength (4.8% ABV) beer with and without electrolyte modification. This investigation explored the effect of further manipulations to the alcohol and sodium content of beer on fluid restoration following exercise. Twelve male volunteers lost 2.03±0.19% body mass (mean±SD) using cycling-based exercise. Participants were then randomly allocated a different beer to consume on four separate occasions. Drinks included low alcohol beer with 25 mmol×L-1 of added sodium [LightBeer+25], low alcohol beer with 50 mmol×L-1 of added sodium [LightBeer+50], mid-strength beer (3.5% ABV) [Mid] or mid-strength beer with 25 mmol×L-1 of added sodium [Mid+25]. Total drink volumes in each trial were equivalent to 150% of body mass loss during exercise, consumed over a 1h period. Body mass, urine samples and regulatory hormones were obtained before and 4h after beverage consumption. Total urine output was significantly lower in the LightBeer+50 trial (1450±183 mL) compared to the LightBeer+25 (1796±284 mL), Mid+25 (1786±373 mL) and Mid (1986±304 mL) trials (all p<0.05). This resulted in significantly higher net body mass following the LightBeer+50 trial (-0.97±0.17kg) compared to all other beverages (LightBeer+25 (-1.30±0.24 kg), Mid+25 (-1.38±0.33 kg) and Mid (-1.58±0.29 kg), all p<0.05). No significant changes to aldosterone or vasopressin were associated with different drink treatments. The electrolyte concentration of low alcohol beer appears to have more significant impact on post exercise fluid retention than small changes in the alcohol content of beer.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom262
dc.relation.ispartofpageto270
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
dc.relation.ispartofvolume25
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical and Sports Nutrition
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHuman Movement and Sports Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111101
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1106
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1116
dc.titleManipulations to the Alcohol and Sodium Content of Beer for Post Exercise Rehydration
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionAccepted Manuscript (AM)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Health
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Human Kinetics. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorIrwin, Chris G.
gro.griffith.authorDesbrow, Ben
gro.griffith.authorGrant, Gary D.
gro.griffith.authorJones, Ashleigh R.
gro.griffith.authorCecchin, Dannii L.
gro.griffith.authorLeveritt, Michael


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