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dc.contributor.authorHughes, Jane M
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Daniel J
dc.contributor.authorHuey, Joel A
dc.contributor.authorReal, Kathryn M
dc.contributor.authorEspinoza, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorMcDougall, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorKind, Peter K
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Steven
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, David T
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T12:31:10Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T12:31:10Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0121858
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/129520
dc.description.abstractThe Australian lungfish is a unique living representative of an ancient dipnoan lineage, listed as 'vulnerable' to extinction under Australia's Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Historical accounts indicate this species occurred naturally in two adjacent river systems in Australia, the Burnett and Mary. Current day populations in other rivers are thought to have arisen by translocation from these source populations. Early genetic work detected very little variation and so had limited power to answer questions relevant for management including how genetic variation is partitioned within and among sub-populations. In this study, we use newly developed microsatellite markers to examine samples from the Burnett and Mary Rivers, as well as from two populations thought to be of translocated origin, Brisbane and North Pine. We test whether there is significant genetic structure among and within river drainages; assign putatively translocated populations to potential source populations; and estimate effective population sizes. Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci genotyped in 218 individuals gave an average within-population heterozygosity of 0.39 which is low relative to other threatened taxa and for freshwater fishes in general. Based on FST values (average over loci = 0.11) and STRUCTURE analyses, we identify three distinct populations in the natural range, one in the Burnett and two distinct populations in the Mary. These analyses also support the hypothesis that the Mary River is the likely source of translocated populations in the Brisbane and North Pine rivers, which agrees with historical published records of a translocation event giving rise to these populations. We were unable to obtain bounded estimates of effective population size, as we have too few genotype combinations, although point estimates were low, ranging from 29 - 129. We recommend that, in order to preserve any local adaptation in the three distinct populations that they be managed separately.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome0121858-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe0121858-10
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPloS One
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.subject.fieldofresearchGenetics not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310599
dc.titleExtremely Low Microsatellite Diversity but Distinct Population Structure in a Long-Lived Threatened Species, the Australian Lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri (Dipnoi)
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Hughes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHughes, Jane M.
gro.griffith.authorSchmidt, Daniel J.


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