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dc.contributor.convenorProfessor Sabiren_AU
dc.contributor.authorGhadiri, Hosseinen_US
dc.contributor.authorHussein, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorRose, Calvinen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Bofuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T19:53:30Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T19:53:30Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-14T22:15:01Z
dc.identifier.doihttp://www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/isco/index_files/Page416.htmen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/13152
dc.description.abstractBuffer strips are commonly used to reduce runoff sediment transport on sloping lands and in the riparian zones of rivers and streams. One of the important aspects of buffer strip which is not well understood is the flow hydrology around the strips. The work reported here extends the current understanding of the physical processes involved in sediment and contaminant reduction by a vetiver grass buffer strip. Experiments were carried out in the Griffith University Tilting-Flume Simulated Rainfall facility using three different soils on three slopes. A dense vetiver strip was inserted in the path of surface runoff in the flume. The soils were made into slurry and introduced to the surface flow. The inflow and outflow of sediment were measured, together with the runoff rate. The rate of deposition in front of the buffer was measured at different distances and times in front of the buffer. Results indicated that the Vetiver grass strip caused a region of enhanced flow depth, upstream of the buffer. The region increased in depth and decreased in length with increasing slope. Buffering action resulted in the deposition of up to 95 % of the added sediment in the backwater region. Suspended sediment loads in the outflow increased with slope but remained primarily in the finer particle size range compared to the input sediment. With most fine particles remaining is suspension in the emerging water downstream of the strips, the value of Vetiver buffer strip in controlling pollutant transport on the slopes and into water bodies is not certain. Water depths, sediment concentrations and rate of deposition were simulated using both hydraulic and erosion/deposition models and predictions compared with data from the flume experiments.en_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent10742 bytes
dc.format.extent149037 bytes
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherISCOen_US
dc.publisher.placeMarrakechen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/isco/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameSoil and Water Conservation in Semi-arid areas. 14th International Conference of ISCOen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleSoil and Water Conservation in Semi-arid areas. 14th International Conference of ISCOen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2006-05-14en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2006-05-19en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationMarrakechen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode300105en_US
dc.titleThe mechanism of flow retardation and erosion control by vegetated buffer strips on sloping landsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE2 - Conference Publications (Non HERDC Eligible)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the author's 2006 Griffith University. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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