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dc.contributor.convenorUrban Research Program, Griffith Universityen_AU
dc.contributor.authorYigitcanlar, Tanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodson, Jagoen_US
dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Brendanen_US
dc.contributor.authorSipe, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.editorPatrick Troyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:05:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:05:24Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2009-08-24T23:36:28Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/soac2005/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/13153
dc.description.abstractLow density suburban development and excessive use of automobiles are associated with serious urban and environmental problems. These problems include traffic congestion, longer commuting times, high automobile dependency, air and water pollution, and increased depletion of natural resources. Master planned development suggests itself as a possible palliative for the ills of low density and high travel. The following study examines the patterns and dynamics of movement in a selection of master planned estates in Australia. The study develops new approaches for assessing the containment of travel within planned development. Its key aim is to clarify and map the relationships between trip generation and urban form and structure. The initial conceptual framework of the paper is developed in a review of literature related to urban form and travel behaviour. These concepts are tested empirically in a pilot study of suburban travel activity in master planned estates. A geographical information systems methodology is used to determine regional journey-to-work patterns and travel containment rates. Factors that influence selfcontainment patterns are estimated with a regression model. This research is a useful preliminary examination of travel self-containment in Australian master planned estates.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent46934 bytes
dc.format.extent962644 bytes
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUrban Research Programen_US
dc.publisher.placeBrisbaneen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/soac2005/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename2nd Bi-Annual National Conference on the State of Australian Citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleRefereed Proceedings of the 2nd Bi-Annual National Conference on the State of Australian Citiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-03-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-12-02en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationGriffith University, Brisbaneen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode310103en_US
dc.titleSustainable Australia: Containing Travel in Master Planned Estatesen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2006 Griffith University. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors. The attached file is reproduced here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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