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dc.contributor.convenorBrendan Gleesonen_AU
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Lexen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.editorPatrick Troyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T17:26:50Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T17:26:50Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2007-08-17T06:42:10Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/soac2005/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/13164
dc.description.abstractThe location (or siting) of new development in relation to other elements of the urban area, such as shopping or employment centres, is known to influence travel patterns, particularly for trips such as journeys to work. Similarly, the design of a development, including such matters as density, land use mixing and connectivity, is now generally understood to influence travel patterns, especially for local trips such as journeys to shops or to schools. By altering either location or design choices it may be possible to increase the opportunities that future populations will have to access the goods and services they need. This paper is concerned with a project to develop a diagnostic tool that seeks to allow decision-makers and others to rate the residential travel performance of land use developments and to identify means to improve that performance. The project aims to measure the extent of travel made and the modes of travel used by residential populations and, with the assistance of accessibility analysis techniques, to use this information as a means to rate the effect of a development's location and design on residential travel. This work is being undertaken to assist in influencing the location and design of urban development to ensure that residential travel patterns contribute to sustainability objectives.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent392952 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUrban Research Program, Griffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeNathan, Queenslanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/soac2005/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename2nd State of Australian Cities Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleRefereed Proceedings of the 2nd Bi-Annual National Conference on the State of Australian Cities Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-11-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-12-02en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370401en_US
dc.titleBuilding an area-based travel sustainability tool: rating the residential travel performance of new urban developmentsen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2006 Griffith University. The attached file is reproduced here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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