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dc.contributor.authorBowie, Paul
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Julie
dc.contributor.authorMacLeod, Marion
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Susan
dc.contributor.authorde Wet, Carl
dc.contributor.authorMcNab, Duncan
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Moya
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, John
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-17T00:30:39Z
dc.date.available2018-04-17T00:30:39Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0960-1643
dc.identifier.doi10.3399/bjgp15X684865
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/134148
dc.description.abstractBackground: The use of checklists to minimise errors is well established in high reliability, safety-critical industries. In health care there is growing interest in checklists to standardise checking processes and ensure task completion, and so provide further systemic defences against error and patient harm. However, in UK general practice there is limited experience of safety checklist use. Aim: To identify workplace hazards that impact on safety, health and wellbeing, and performance, and codesign a standardised checklist process. Design and setting: Application of mixed methods to identify system hazards in Scottish general practices and develop a safety checklist based on human factors design principles. Method: A multiprofessional ‘expert’ group (n = 7) and experienced front-line GPs, nurses, and practice managers (n = 18) identified system hazards and developed and validated a preliminary checklist using a combination of literature review, documentation review, consensus building workshops using a mini-Delphi process, and completion of content validity index exercise. Results: A prototype safety checklist was developed and validated consisting of six safety domains (for example, medicines management), 22 sub-categories (for example, emergency drug supplies) and 78 related items (for example, stock balancing, secure drug storage, and cold chain temperature recording). Conclusion: Hazards in the general practice work system were prioritised that can potentially impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of patients, GP team members, and practice performance, and a necessary safety checklist prototype was designed. However, checklist efficacy in improving safety processes and outcomes is dependent on user commitment, and support from leaders and promotional champions. Although further usability development and testing is necessary, the concept should be of interest in the UK and internationally.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoyal College of General Practitioners
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome330
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe343
dc.relation.ispartofissue634
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of General Practice
dc.relation.ispartofvolume65
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.titleParticipatory design of a preliminary safety checklist for general practice
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.rights.copyright© 2015 Royal College of General Practitioners. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorde Wet, Carl


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