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dc.contributor.authorTuckett, Anthony G
dc.contributor.authorHodgkinson, Brent
dc.contributor.authorRouillon, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorBalil-Lozoya, Tania
dc.contributor.authorParker, Deborah
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-15T01:18:30Z
dc.date.available2019-03-15T01:18:30Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1748-3735
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/opn.12071
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/134159
dc.description.abstractAim This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of group music therapy (MT) intervention on behaviours of older people with dementia. Method Reported here are qualitative data from five, semi‐structured focus groups; two comprising a total of seven family members and three comprising a total of 23 staff members. Results A number of core themes emerged: temporality, effect and policy with a number of subthemes. The MT effect is tempered by the temporality of (i) the older person's dementia state, (ii) the session and (iii) the psychosomatic effect on the older person. Music therapy is perceived to (i) evoke memories and facilitate reminiscence, (ii) act as a diversion (has an instrumental value) and it is contentious to discount the (iii) dichotomy between music and therapist in terms of the overall effect. Finally, policymakers need to know that MT is (i) highly prized and more, not less, MT is recommended. Conclusion Findings from this study illustrate that the timing of the MT session has consequences for the workflow in the residential aged care facility; MT has a psychosomatic effect and participants here evaluate this as temporal. Care providers and family members acknowledge the instrumental value of MT and its helping with cognition and exercise. They have mixed views about the effects of the music and the effect on the older person by the therapist but most definitely want policymakers to ensure more, not less, planned and better funded MT is part of ongoing care in the residential aged care context. Areas for future research and policy are also highlighted.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom146
dc.relation.ispartofpageto157
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Older People Nursing
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.keywordsCarer
dc.subject.keywordsDementia
dc.subject.keywordsFamily music therapy
dc.subject.keywordsQualitative research
dc.subject.keywordsResidential aged care
dc.titleWhat carers and family said about music therapy on behaviours of older people with dementia in residential aged care
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorHodgkinson, Brent


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