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dc.contributor.convenorBrendan Gleesonen_AU
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Lexen_US
dc.contributor.editorPatrick Troyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T10:27:38Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T10:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.modified2007-08-17T06:42:42Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/soac2005/en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/13415
dc.description.abstractThe use of rating schemes has emerged in recent decades as a popular planning tool to provide means to assess the performance of development proposals in order to meet desired sustainability objectives. This paper seeks to explore the validity of the formalised rating approach and asks whether it is prudent to consider applications for developments of a larger scale. A brief history and genealogy of rating schemes is presented, demonstrating that while the approach has been extended to small scale residential and commercial developments (i.e. BASIX and Green Star) it has not generally been used at the local area scale applicable to planning for comprehensive development sites (master-planned communities, transit oriented developments and other structure plans generally). Key issues with the formalised rating approach are raised drawn from interviews with the creators of particular schemes, persons who have brought schemes through to the marketplace, developers and consultants forced to use ratings schemes as part of development application processes, and planners charged with assessing developments under these frameworks. Issues raised include the variable impacts of particular schemes, the use of minimum standards/benchmarks, and the demands placed on users. Questions are then formed as to where the use of the formalised rating approach is headed and whether it is either feasible or desirable to apply them at the local area scale of urban development.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent199987 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeNathan, Queenslanden_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/conference/soac2005/en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename2nd State of Australian Cities Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle2nd State of Australian Cities Conferenceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2005-11-30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2005-12-02en_US
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_AU
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370401en_US
dc.titlePlanning by rating scheme: genealogy, scales of application and ways forward for the formalised rating approach to urban development approvalen_US
dc.typeConference outputen_US
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conference Publications (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publicationsen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2006 Griffith University. The attached file is reproduced here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authors.en_AU
gro.date.issued2006
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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